National association – Gloucester Downtown Association http://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 19:18:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png National association – Gloucester Downtown Association http://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/ 32 32 Bayada and Professional Home Care Groups Form Alliance to Address Workforce Challenges https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/bayada-and-professional-home-care-groups-form-alliance-to-address-workforce-challenges/ Wed, 18 May 2022 19:18:04 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/bayada-and-professional-home-care-groups-form-alliance-to-address-workforce-challenges/ A new home care industry coalition issued a call to action on Wednesday for the country to tackle what its members described as a staffing “crisis”. Bayada Home Health Care, the National Association for Home Care and Hospice, and the Home Care Association of America are seeking partners to join their Home Care Workforce Action […]]]>

A new home care industry coalition issued a call to action on Wednesday for the country to tackle what its members described as a staffing “crisis”.

Bayada Home Health Care, the National Association for Home Care and Hospice, and the Home Care Association of America are seeking partners to join their Home Care Workforce Action Alliance. They aim to catalyze action to address a severe labor shortage that members say is leaving potential patients without care.

“We all recognize that this is an issue that needs to be addressed, but we all continue to work within our silos,” said the president of the National Association for Home and Hospice Care, Bill Dombi, during a webinar on Wednesday.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that there will be nearly 600,000 health and personal care aide job openings each year during this decade as current workers leave the field or retire. These helpers earn a median hourly wage of $14.15, which is lower than the median wage for retail employees. Demand is also increasing because the population is aging.

Bayada Home Health Care has never turned away so many potential customers or had so many open shifts as it does today, said David Totaro, the company’s director of government affairs. In September, the provider refused 50% of patient referrals; in March, that figure rose to 67%, he said. “The challenges have only gotten worse in recent years,” he said.

The Home Care Workforce Action Alliance seeks partners from industry, patient groups, workers, educators and government to address issues such as low pay, lack of benefits, limited access to unclear training and career growth opportunities, Dombi said.

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Biden seeks to boost housing supply in the absence of congressional action https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/biden-seeks-to-boost-housing-supply-in-the-absence-of-congressional-action/ Mon, 16 May 2022 18:56:21 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/biden-seeks-to-boost-housing-supply-in-the-absence-of-congressional-action/ The Department of Housing and Urban Development will also encourage state and local recipients to use money from more flexible programs, including Community Development Block Grants, to create more affordable housing. The administration said the Treasury Department will encourage state and local governments to direct pandemic relief funds provided by Congress in 2021 toward affordable […]]]>

The Department of Housing and Urban Development will also encourage state and local recipients to use money from more flexible programs, including Community Development Block Grants, to create more affordable housing.

The administration said the Treasury Department will encourage state and local governments to direct pandemic relief funds provided by Congress in 2021 toward affordable housing. So far, about 570 jurisdictions have committed $11.7 billion of those funds to housing activities, the administration said.

The White House will also encourage the construction of affordable housing by lowering barriers to financing. This includes streamlining procedures and requirements across federal programs, including low-income housing tax credits, HUD programs and the Housing Trust Fund, and exploring additional federal support for financing manufactured homes.

The administration called on Congress to take action to boost housing supply, including providing the $150 billion in housing funds included in the frozen social safety net and climate spending package. The White House also listed smaller actions Congress could take, which could give some idea of ​​what housing provisions might look like in a reduced climate and social spending package.

The administration has asked Congress to create a Housing Supply Fund to distribute $25 billion in grants to state and local housing agencies working to boost the supply of affordable housing. Congress should also expand low-income housing tax credits to spur the development of affordable, owner-occupied housing, the White House said.

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Houston leaders help parents deal with baby formula shortage https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/houston-leaders-help-parents-deal-with-baby-formula-shortage/ Sun, 15 May 2022 01:51:08 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/houston-leaders-help-parents-deal-with-baby-formula-shortage/ For Third Ward residents and new parents Ovie and Mikayla Cade, finding formula for their baby, Kennedy, has been difficult. The Cades and many other parents across the country have been haunted by empty shelves as voluntary recalls and supply chain issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic have taken their toll on the supply chain […]]]>

For Third Ward residents and new parents Ovie and Mikayla Cade, finding formula for their baby, Kennedy, has been difficult.

The Cades and many other parents across the country have been haunted by empty shelves as voluntary recalls and supply chain issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic have taken their toll on the supply chain of infant formula.

To help, U.S. Representative Sheila Jackson-Lee and volunteers from the National Association for Disaster Services of Christian Churches distributed formula and sanitary supplies Saturday afternoon at Yates High School.

“It’s better than nothing,” Ovie said. “I feel happy and grateful right now and I used to go to this school, so that’s one of the good things about it.”

As of May 8, the nationwide stock-out rate for infant formula has climbed to 43%, according to Data assembly — a retail data analysis company. Comparatively, in the first seven months of 2021, the stock-out rate was between 2 and 8%.

In February, Abbott Laboratories – which makes Similac, Alimentum and EleCare infant formula – issued a voluntary recall for products made at their plant in Sturgis, Michigan, after four consumers filed complaints that Salmonella was detected in infants who have consumed focmula, according to the US Food and Drug Administration.

The incident exacerbated an already existing shortage and high demand, experts said.

Demand for formula, Jackson Lee said, was so intense this week in Washington D.C. that it led her to organize Saturday’s event with the NACC to distribute a trailer full of formula, which her office said , would help more than 300 local families.

“We did this because babies grow and develop at a very fast rate and I can’t suffer for a moment – or their parents – when they aren’t fed,” Jackson-Lee said. “The idea of ​​rushing to donate formula to carry them around for a few days is to… bridge to find a store or find a supply in the next two days.”

Dr. Nataly Carol Daly, a local obstetrician who has practiced in Houston for 40 years, emphasized the importance of the availability of infant formula and called the shortage how unprecedented the shortage was.

“For those who choose not to breastfeed — and there are women who can’t breastfeed — surely we need to have formula when it comes to babies,” Daly said. “It’s a shocking thing to happen, I’ve never heard of it in my life and I’ve been here for a while.”

It is crucial for mothers who can breastfeed, said Dr Janice Powells, adding that as a pediatrician she receives daily requests from mothers for formula.

The formula provides essential nutrients in the first year of life, Powells added, cautioning parents against trying to create a homemade formula.

“The first 12 months are so important to how they will develop and do in school, later in life and into adulthood,” she said. “If parents who are struggling and can’t get the formula or find it decide to mix their own concoction…there could be a problem with the minerals being out of balance and the chemistry not being right.”

Jackson Lee said she plans to contact national disaster management organizations to marshal the resources needed for the shortage and get the formula into the hands of parents.

“Entities that are dealing with a disaster may have other products in other places in Texas and they can share them statewide and they can share them with us,” she said. “Hopefully we get a break from the supply chain crisis and things get moving.”

joel.umanzor@chron.com

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Larry Holley, basketball coach of William Jewell, dies at 76 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/larry-holley-basketball-coach-of-william-jewell-dies-at-76/ Fri, 13 May 2022 03:00:24 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/larry-holley-basketball-coach-of-william-jewell-dies-at-76/ LIBERTY, Mo. — Former William Jewell basketball coach Larry Holley died Thursday at the age of 76. Holley, a native of Jameson, Missouri, coached and student basketball at the William Jewell Campus for 44 years, winning 918 games as a head coach. He was selected to five Hall of Fame members – Greater Kansas City […]]]>

LIBERTY, Mo. — Former William Jewell basketball coach Larry Holley died Thursday at the age of 76.

Holley, a native of Jameson, Missouri, coached and student basketball at the William Jewell Campus for 44 years, winning 918 games as a head coach.

He was selected to five Hall of Fame members – Greater Kansas City Basketball Coaches Association, Missouri Basketball Coaches Association, William Jewell College, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and Missouri Sports.

He coached 24 NAIA All-Americans and his teams were No. 1 in the nation in 1996 and 2004.

In 2011, the Kansas City Sports Commission presented him with the Earl Smith Award, inducting Holley into the Greater Kansas City Amateur Sports Hall of Champions.

He also received the Gary Filbert Legacy Award (2014) for lifetime achievement in Missouri State basketball, which is the highest honor bestowed by the Missouri Basketball Coaches Association.

Funeral arrangements are forthcoming and the Holley family have requested confidentiality during this time.

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‘Tales with Tails’ wins national award https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/tales-with-tails-wins-national-award/ Wed, 11 May 2022 02:17:32 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/tales-with-tails-wins-national-award/ Dog Warden Chastity Crowder reading to a former Mixon resident. Mixon listens to the Elizabeth and Larry story. He was later adopted after being such a good boy at story time. Courtesy picture WASHINGTON — Shelby County has received an Achievement Award from the National Association of Counties (NACo). The awards recognize innovative and effective […]]]>

Dog Warden Chastity Crowder reading to a former Mixon resident. Mixon listens to the Elizabeth and Larry story. He was later adopted after being such a good boy at story time.

Courtesy picture

WASHINGTON — Shelby County has received an Achievement Award from the National Association of Counties (NACo). The awards recognize innovative and effective county government programs that strengthen services to residents.

NACo recognized the Bob Sargeant & Family Shelby County Animal Shelter for its innovative “Tails with Tales” program. Tales with Tails was created to provide information about the Shelby County Animal Shelter to potential pet adoptive families and to address the social isolation of children in the community during COVID.

The shelter staff were determined to maintain their record of high adoption rates and knew that a creative new approach to the community was needed. The program was developed fairly quickly once the need and solution was determined, with the Facebook Live program being developed over several weeks.

Tales with Tails combines reading a book about animals to the public and introducing one of the shelter’s adoptable pets or the shelter’s mascot, a cat named Batman. The program launched in February 2021 and has been a weekly event since then with stories told every Thursday evening. Tales with Tails is for Shelby County Animal Shelter’s 8,500+ Facebook followers.

In addition to shelter staff reading this story hour, local volunteers, librarians and veterinarians, a total of eleven different guests, took turns reading a book for Tales with Tails. The program costs the county nothing except the time spent by shelter staff and volunteers. Many books read during the program were borrowed from county libraries.

“Tales with Tails deserves an NACo Achievement Award for several reasons. Shelby County Animal Shelter employees have taken a difficult situation with COVID and turned it into a positive weekly program for the community,” said Commissioner Julie Ehemann. “Not only have the staff maintained the shelter’s pet adoption rates, but they have created a whole new audience of children who will be more likely to appreciate and be kind to animals. The program should be recognized for its simplicity and its ability to be emulated by counties elsewhere that do not have access to much funding or other resources.

NACo Chairman Larry Johnson said, “Across the country, counties are working tirelessly to support residents and support recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. This year’s award-winning programs show how counties work every day to build healthy, safe and thriving communities. »

Nationally, awards are presented in 18 different categories that reflect the broad and comprehensive services provided by counties. Categories include children and youth, criminal justice and public safety, county administration, information technology, health, civic engagement and many more.

Started in 1970, NACo’s annual Achievement Awards program is designed to recognize county government innovations. Each applicant is judged on their own merits and not against other applications received.

Dog Warden Chastity Crowder reading to a former Mixon resident. Mixon listens to the Elizabeth and Larry story. He was later adopted after being such a good boy at story time.

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Exclusive data: Freshmen, held back during pandemic, fuel ‘bulge’ in 9th grade enrollment https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/exclusive-data-freshmen-held-back-during-pandemic-fuel-bulge-in-9th-grade-enrollment/ Mon, 09 May 2022 11:17:38 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/exclusive-data-freshmen-held-back-during-pandemic-fuel-bulge-in-9th-grade-enrollment/ Learn4Life, a nationwide network of charter schools, typically caters to older teens who struggle to accumulate enough credits to graduate. But when a new site opened in San Antonio this school year, principal Crissy Franco received an unusual number of applications from 14- and 15-year-old students. They included ninth graders who got no credit in […]]]>

Learn4Life, a nationwide network of charter schools, typically caters to older teens who struggle to accumulate enough credits to graduate. But when a new site opened in San Antonio this school year, principal Crissy Franco received an unusual number of applications from 14- and 15-year-old students.

They included ninth graders who got no credit in their first semester and those who should have been in 10th grade but were out of school for a year.

“Normally, you don’t steer young kids toward dropout recovery,” Franco said. “Some of them are like, ‘What’s a credit?'”

Crissy Franco, left, Principal of Learn4Life in San Antonio, Texas, and Graciano Garza, a student who graduated in December, at the school’s August 2021 opening. (Learn4Life at Edgewood Independent School District)

Those students who were held back are among the reasons Texas saw a 9% increase in its freshman class this year, more than four times the state’s annual growth rate before the pandemic.

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This pattern has been demonstrated in more than a dozen states, according to registration data compiled by Burbio, an information services company, and shared exclusively with The 74.

The new data, from 35 states and the District of Columbia, adds to the complicated picture of student comings and goings in the age of COVID. With many young children who delayed kindergarten and kindergarten during school closures and are now returning to the education system, an increase in enrollment in the early grades was expected. But 15 states and DC saw growth of at least 5% in ninth graders from 2020-21, and in a few states, including New Mexico and North Carolina, the increase in freshmen has far exceeded that of kindergarten children.

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While the return of families to public schools has helped growth in ninth grade this year, retention rates have nearly doubled in some states and districts, and educators don’t expect next year to be much. much better.

“We’re a generation that’s going to have people with two-year gaps in their education,” said Jeffrey Cole, principal of Winston County High, a rural Alabama school midway between Huntsville and Birmingham.

If freshmen fail only two terms, Cole usually moves them to 10th grade. But for the first time in 19 years as principal, he has students failing all four terms. He thinks they should have stayed in eighth grade. Across the state, ninth-grade enrollment has jumped at a much higher rate than before the pandemic.

Districts often see a “bulge” in the first year when students don’t pass enough courses to move on, said Eric Wearne, director of the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University outside Atlanta. But he added that it’s no surprise that COVID disruptions and remote learning have made matters worse.

“The students were in ninth grade,” he said, “and the COVID situation was so difficult that more of them than usual didn’t earn enough credits to be considered grade 10.and graders again.

Retention data in some states and districts confirms this. Figures from last fall show that 18% of ninth-graders in the Houston Independent School District repeated the year, significantly higher than the district’s pre-pandemic rate of 10%. And in North Carolina, more than 16% of last year’s freshman class were retained, about double the rate in previous years. Rural Maryland district officials in Albuquerque, New Mexico, also saw higher retention rates this year.

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The majority of states where ninth-grade enrollment has exceeded 5% are concentrated in the South, where they have “well-defined promotion criteria” for freshmen, such as course-leaving exams, Robert explained. Balfanz, who directs the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University. Such policies were widely implemented in the early 2000s at the start of the accountability-driven No Child Left Behind era, but have since been suspended in many states.

What hasn’t changed, he says, is that students still need to earn enough credits to graduate.

“It’s the long tail of the pandemic,” he said. “This will impact graduation rates three years from now.”

He added that during remote learning, high school students were more likely to have homework without live instruction and had to “manage the execution of the work themselves.” With many high schools canceling orientation in the fall of 2020, he said rising ninth-graders might not have fully understood the consequences of failing a class.

New Mexico is among the states where the increase in ninth graders is higher than in kindergarten. (Burbio)

“Fallen off the radar”

The increase in retention is an example of how the pandemic has altered existing patterns that enrollment forecasters use to help districts plan for the future. In his work with school districts, Jerry Oelerich, principal analyst at consulting firm Flo-Analytics, explains the fact that 2007 – when most of that year’s ninth graders were born – was a record year for births. That alone, however, doesn’t fully explain the large increases some states are seeing in ninth grade, Oelerich said.

Private school enrollment and home school also increased last year. But students often return to traditional high schools to play sports. And many parents decide they are not cut out to teach high school students.

“Their expertise is sort of exhausted,” said Kent Martin, principal analyst at Flo-Analytics and a former teacher and administrator in Washington state. “You really have to be a content expert, like a teacher.”

Ronn Nozoe, CEO of the National Association of Secondary School Principals, said it made sense that with schools mostly open this year, families who opted for private schools would come back and “save their money.”

“There are a lot of kids who have gone unnoticed,” Nozoe said. “If you’re going to move in again, you want to start this in ninth – not 10th, 11th or 12th.”

That’s what Virginia’s mother, Kate O’Harra, decided after removing her son Jack Mulhall from the Loudoun County District last year and enrolling him in Stride (formerly K12), a nationwide network of virtual schools, for the eighth grade.

“He wasn’t great,” although O’Harra, a Pilates instructor, and her husband, an IT professional, weren’t always available to help with homework. When the schools closed, Jack was about to overcome some of the scattering that comes with his ADHD. But the district’s distance learning program, which O’Harra described as “a complete and utter failure,” halted that progress.

“We were well placed before COVID. Now everything is on the map.

The affluent suburb has been the focus of several highly politicized controversies on the rights of transgender students and the use of so-called “critical race theory”. But Jack’s desire to return to school with his friends and his wish for a normal school structure convinced O’Harra to return to the district for ninth grade.

Still, the move didn’t solve everything for Jack, now at Woodgrove High School.

“We entered 9and grade very unprepared,” his mother said, adding that after a year of distance learning, he struggles with some social cues, like not knowing how to take a joke.

Related

‘Try everything to find them’: Districts launch new efforts to bring chronically absent 9th graders back to class

Jack said his only contact with friends during eighth grade was playing “Call of Duty,” and the only person he met virtually through Stride was his math teacher. He still lacks some organizational skills and has fallen behind in Spanish and earth sciences. It will start next year with a tutor.

Jack Mulhall with his dog Peaches. Jack attended eighth grade with the online Stride program, but returned to a traditional high school for ninth grade in Loudoun County, Virginia last fall. (Kate O’Harra)

“I didn’t really have any homework for science [in eighth grade]. I was left adrift without any knowledge,” he said. But back at a mainstream school, Jack plays football and lacrosse and says, “I can actually see and talk to my teachers in real life.”

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At national scale registration in Stride has fallen slightly this year – to 187,000 from 189,400 last year, but still well above the pre-pandemic figure of around 123,000.

Virtual programs are another reason ninth-grade classes in some districts are swelling. Public Schools in Virginia’s Mecklenburg County, a rural district not far from the North Carolina state line, has offered a virtual option through Stride so parents still concerned about COVID don’t pull their children out of school. homeschooling and that the district does not lose funding.

The virtual program has increased ninth-grade enrollment from 337 in 2020-21 to 609 this year. But Superintendent Paul Nichols has regrets and has suggested distance education shares some of the blame for students who stray off course.

“We will not be offering any virtual education options to students next year,” he said. “We’re concerned that most of them haven’t completed much, if any, real academic work.”

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Is the Donovan Mitchell era over for the National Basketball Association’s Utah Jazz? https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/is-the-donovan-mitchell-era-over-for-the-national-basketball-associations-utah-jazz/ Sat, 07 May 2022 19:07:28 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/is-the-donovan-mitchell-era-over-for-the-national-basketball-associations-utah-jazz/ After another disappointing NBA Playoffs streak, the Utah Jazz haven’t made it past the second round since 2007, despite passing a few notable stars to Utah. On paper, Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert seem like a perfect match. Mitchell, a goalie who has career averages of 23.9 PPG and 4.5 APG, has been one of […]]]>

After another disappointing NBA Playoffs streak, the Utah Jazz haven’t made it past the second round since 2007, despite passing a few notable stars to Utah. On paper, Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert seem like a perfect match.

Mitchell, a goalie who has career averages of 23.9 PPG and 4.5 APG, has been one of the league’s best goaltenders since his rookie season. Gobert is a defensive maestro, who has racked up three DPOY awards and cemented his place among the top big men in the league.

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Aberg named Ben Hogan Award finalist https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/aberg-named-ben-hogan-award-finalist/ Thu, 05 May 2022 19:06:04 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/aberg-named-ben-hogan-award-finalist/ LUBBOCK, Texas – Texas Tech Junior Ludwig Aberg was named a finalist for the 2022 Ben Hogan Prize presented by PNC Bank. The Hogan Trophy Award Foundation, Friends of Golf (FOG) and Golf Coaches Association of America (GCAA) announced the three finalists on Thursday with Sam Bennett of Texas A&M and Eugenio Chacarra of Oklahoma […]]]>
LUBBOCK, Texas – Texas Tech Junior Ludwig Aberg was named a finalist for the 2022 Ben Hogan Prize presented by PNC Bank. The Hogan Trophy Award Foundation, Friends of Golf (FOG) and Golf Coaches Association of America (GCAA) announced the three finalists on Thursday with Sam Bennett of Texas A&M and Eugenio Chacarra of Oklahoma State joining Aberg on the prestigious list.

Finalists will attend a black-tie dinner on Monday, May 23 at the Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, where the winner will be crowned. The winner will receive an exemption for the 2023 Charles Schwab Challenge, played each year at the Colonial.

Aberg and Bennett are the first-ever finalists from Texas Tech and Texas A&M. With the addition of Chacarra, Oklahoma State now has its 10th finalist in attendance and seeks its fifth winner in the past 20 years.

Aberg, a junior from Eslov, Sweden, won the 2022 Big 12 Championship individual title and ranks in the top five in all four major ranking systems, including No. 2 in the World Amateur Golf Ranking (WAGR) and #1 according to Scratch Players. A 2021 European Amateur runner-up, Aberg also tied for 30th in the European Tour’s Scandinavian Mixed and shared 51st in the PGA TOUR’s 2021 Butterfield Bermuda Championship. He will be a member of the 2022 Arnold Palmer Cup international team, his second consecutive tournament selection.

In college play, Aberg has recorded eight straight top-15 finishes, including victories at the Big 12 and Prestige championships. The Red Raider have finished no worse than sixth in their last six tournaments and are averaging 70.20 from 10 events this season.

Bennett, a senior from Madisonville, Texas, who still has a year of eligibility left, is the highest-ranked player on the Golfweek/Sagarin College rankings. It is also ranked third by Golfstat and fifth by WAGR. The November Ben Hogan Award Golfer of the Month was the winner of the 2021 Spirit International Golf Championship. Additionally, Bennett was a member of the 2021 United States Palmer Cup winning team and was named to the American team in 2022.

For the Aggies, Bennett won the Louisiana Classics and recorded a runner-up spot at the John Burns Intercollegiate. In total, he finished in the top five on six occasions, finishing in the top three five times. He averages 69.42 shots over eight tournaments.

Chacarra, a senior from Madrid, Spain, who will return for his final season next year, ranks in the top seven in all four ranking systems, including second in the World Amateur Scratch Players Ranking and fourth in the WAGR. He was a member of the international team at the 2021 Palmer Cup, where he posted a 4-0 mark, and was selected to represent the team again in 2022. Chacarra also earned medalist honors at the Championship. European amateur team 2021.

For Oklahoma State, he averaged 69.16 over 34 laps with eight top-10 finishes. Chacarra won two tournaments this spring, winning the Amer Ari Invitational and the National Invitational Tournament. He was the Ben Hogan Award Golfer of the Month for March.
The Ben Hogan Award presented by PNC Bank annually recognizes the top male college golfer in NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA Division I, II or III based on all college, amateur and professional events over the past 12 months. . Three of the top six players in the Official World Golf Rankings—No. No. 2 Jon Rahm (2015, 2016), No. 4 Viktor Hovland (2019) and No. 6 Patrick Cantlay (2012) – are past recipients of the honor, while No. 3 Collin Morikawa (2018, 2019) was a two-time Ben Hogan Award Finalist.

The award selection committee, which votes at every stage of the process, is made up of 34 leaders and experts from professional, amateur and collegiate golf, both nationally and internationally. Aberg, Bennett and Chacarra were selected from a group of semi-finalists that also included Pierceson Coody of Texas, Chris Gotterup of Oklahoma, Cole Hammer of Texas, RJ Manke of Washington, Logan McAllister of Oklahoma, Trent Phillips of Georgia and Stanford’s Michael Thorbjornsen.

The Ben Hogan Award presented by PNC Bank began honoring the Colonial Country Club’s outstanding amateur college golfer in 2002. Prior to its move to Fort Worth, the original Ben Hogan Trophy, which used a different set of criteria for its winner, was been awarded to Bel-Air Country Club in Los Angeles beginning in 1990.

The Hogan Award winners at Colonial have combined to rack up 69 global wins, including 51 PGA TOUR wins, and have raised over $330 million in prize money worldwide, including over $300 million on the PGA ROUND. Additionally, the group has competed in 12 Ryder Cups, a dozen Presidents Cups and won two FedExCup Championships.

In addition to Rahm, Cantlay and Hovland, past recipients include: Ricky Barnes (2003), Matt Every (2006), Rickie Fowler (2008), Doug Ghim (2018), Bill Haas (2004), Chris Kirk (2007), Hunter Mahan (2003), Maverick McNealy (2017), Ryan Moore (2005), John Pak (2021), Patrick Rodgers (2014), Kyle Stanley (2009), Nick Taylor (2010), Sahith Theegala (2020), DJ Trahan (2002), Peter Uihlein (2011) and Chris Williams (2013).

Since 2002, the Ben Hogan Prize presented by PNC Bank has distributed more than $875,000 in scholarships to more than 30 universities and charities. For more information, visit TheBenHoganAward.org and follow @BenHoganAward on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

About PNC Bank PNC Bank, National Association, is a member of PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (NYSE: PNC). PNC is one of the largest diversified financial services institutions in the United States, organized around its customers and communities for strong relationships and a local offering of personal and business banking services, including a full range of loan products; specialized services for businesses and government entities, including corporate banking, real estate finance and asset-based lending; wealth management and asset management. For more information about PNC, visit www.pnc.com.


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EXIT Realty supports creative solutions to help people buy homes https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/exit-realty-supports-creative-solutions-to-help-people-buy-homes/ Tue, 03 May 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/exit-realty-supports-creative-solutions-to-help-people-buy-homes/ As house prices rise much faster than incomes, EXIT supports measures to improve financing and build multi-family homes Featured image for EXIT Realty Corp. International Featured image for EXIT Realty Corp. International WOBURN, Mass., May 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As U.S. housing prices rise exponentially faster than incomes, EXIT Realty offers creative solutions at […]]]>

As house prices rise much faster than incomes, EXIT supports measures to improve financing and build multi-family homes

Featured image for EXIT Realty Corp. International

Featured image for EXIT Realty Corp. International

WOBURN, Mass., May 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As U.S. housing prices rise exponentially faster than incomes, EXIT Realty offers creative solutions at the local, state and even national level to make housing affordable for all.

Recent reports show stark disparities between people’s incomes and the cost of homes. The national median home sale price nearly doubled in the past decadeto around $408,000, while revenues from 2010 to 2020 increased by only 15%at around $67,500.

This means that buying a house is more difficult than usual. The traditional rule of thumb is that the price of a house is about two and a half years of income. Now, on average, it’s six times a person’s annual income.

“Over the past 30 years, the median income hasn’t really increased that much for a household or a family, compared to the increase in the number of homes and the cost of living,” said Tami Bonnell, co-chair of EXIT Realty Corp. . International. “On top of that, housing prices have gone up even more during the pandemic and rental costs are higher in many places than owning homes. Simply put, safe and affordable housing is an urgent need.

“However, as we look around America, there is hope for solutions to this problem, and at EXIT Realty, we are helping to lead these creative solutions that can bring more people into homes than they can afford.”

Individual realtors can make a difference, Bonnell said, such as EXIT’s Corwyn Melette, broker and owner of EXIT Realty Lowcountry Group in North Charleston, South Carolina.

Melette grew up in the rural south at a time when tobacco farming was declining and military bases were closing. He has therefore been dedicated to finding affordable housing solutions and helping people realize their dream of home ownership, especially first-generation homeowners.

In a webinar interview with Bonnellwhich airs May 18, Melette will share teaching moments, including the importance of experiential exposure, the first places people should look for affordable housing options, success stories, and next steps.

Bonnell also points to bigger system-level fixes, like a plan by the California Association of REALTORS’®, in partnership with various nonprofits, to close the gap affecting underserved communities across the state by regarding home ownership, and the National Association of REALTORS’ call for action to develop affordable housing.

EXIT also supports measures to encourage the construction of what Bonnell calls the “missing path” to homeownership: multi-family duplexes, triplexes, quadruplexes and townhouses, traditional affordable starter homes that have fallen out of favor with builders. Local and state governments can promote their construction with remedial measures, zoning changes, funding adjustments, tax credits and other programs, Bonnell said.

“We’re extremely encouraged by the creative solutions we’re seeing coming to market and seeing organizations come together to create affordable housing,” Bonnell said.

“We are also proud of our real estate professionals who educate potential buyers about financing the home buying process in their local communities and help them become homeowners. EXIT was founded on the idea of ​​helping people – both our agents and their clients – live their dreams, and so we are dedicated to home ownership, the traditional number one way to build a real wealth and family stability.”

On

EXIT Realty Corp. International helps people live their why and real estate is our how. Shaking up the real estate industry since 1996 with a unique business model, EXIT Realty is founded and built on human potential focused on one thing: delivering exceptional consumer experiences. Every EXIT associate and the customers we serve are backed by experience, dedication and a proven commitment to people first.

To learn more, visit https://exitrealty.com/ and joinexitrealty.com.

Media Contact:

Mary Penaloza

maria.penaloza@newswire.com

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Majority of owners have regrets https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/majority-of-owners-have-regrets/ Sun, 01 May 2022 13:00:01 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/majority-of-owners-have-regrets/ As mortgage costs continue to rise alongside home prices, some buyers are faced with another problem: regret. Among recent buyers, 70% have at least one regret, according to recent survey by HomeLight, an online real estate marketplace, which surveyed 1,620 people across the United States earlier this year. One of the main regrets – cited […]]]>

As mortgage costs continue to rise alongside home prices, some buyers are faced with another problem: regret.

Among recent buyers, 70% have at least one regret, according to recent survey by HomeLight, an online real estate marketplace, which surveyed 1,620 people across the United States earlier this year. One of the main regrets – cited by about 1 in 5 respondents – was underestimating the total cost of buying a house.

A February Zillow Poll over 2,000 new and potential homeowners found similar results: 75% of recent buyers had at least one regret about their purchase, including 38% of buyers who said they wished they had spent more time looking for a home.

Other common regrets in both surveys were home location, buying a home too quickly, and the unexpected cost of repairs or maintenance.

These sentiments make sense, as the market hasn’t been favorable to home buyers: homes are selling faster than ever and bidding wars are common, often with multiple bids above the asking price. And many buyers may have felt pressured to buy before interest rates rose further, as widely expected.

According to a Zillow study released last week.

However, this sense of shared regret suggests potential buyers might want to reevaluate what they can actually afford, says Lawrence Yun, chief economist at the National Association of Realtors.

He advises first-time buyers to “understand their maximum financial limit” before shopping for a home, and to reset their expectations if the type of home they want is no longer affordable. In this case, homebuyers might want to look for a cheaper home or find other compromises, like a different neighborhood or less space.

New homeowners are often surprised by the added costs of owning a property outside of the mortgage and down payment. These costs include property taxes, insurance, condominium fees, repairs and closing costs.

Some of the initial costs are also high. On average, buyers pay closing costs averaging 3% to 6% of the purchase price, by Quicken Loans. And a common rule of thumb for the cost of annual repairs is 1% of the total value of the housethat’s about $5,000 a year for a $500,000 house.

To help avoid unexpected costs, Yun says a good realtor should be able to provide a clear idea of ​​what to expect so there are “no surprises.” You can also consult the Guide from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on what to expect when buying a home.

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