National association – Gloucester Downtown Association http://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 20:11:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png National association – Gloucester Downtown Association http://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/ 32 32 I’m the chief economist for the National Home Builders Association. Here are the 5 things you need to know about the housing market now https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/im-the-chief-economist-for-the-national-home-builders-association-here-are-the-5-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-housing-market-now/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 20:03:49 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/im-the-chief-economist-for-the-national-home-builders-association-here-are-the-5-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-housing-market-now/ In a recent MarketWatch article by journalist Alisa Wolfson, NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz shares his thoughts on the current state of the housing market. His first prediction is that mortgage rates will continue to rise as the Federal Reserve tightens monetary policy. Then, in 2024, housing demand for both new and existing home sales […]]]>

In a recent MarketWatch article by journalist Alisa Wolfson, NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz shares his thoughts on the current state of the housing market. His first prediction is that mortgage rates will continue to rise as the Federal Reserve tightens monetary policy. Then, in 2024, housing demand for both new and existing home sales will recover, with home construction expanding to help reduce the housing deficit. Read on for four more Dietz predictions.

Builders will build fewer homes: Indeed, 2022 will be the first year since 2011 in which the construction of single-family homes will decrease compared to the previous year, he specifies.

After a construction boom in the second half of 2020 and 2021, the homebuilding sector is contracting, Dietz says. “Builder sentiment, as measured by the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI), has declined over the past eight months, falling to its lowest level since 2014. The HMO’s decline reflects the weakening market conditions for homebuilders, including sales conditions and buyer traffic. The drop in sentiment also indicates that single-family construction will continue to decline over the next quarter,” says Dietz.

He says home construction contracted as housing affordability fell to its lowest level in more than 10 years amid rising mortgage interest rates. This has combined with higher construction costs which have increased by 35% since 2020 and have lowered the asking price for home buyers.

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LCDA Releases Latest Latino Advice Monitor Revealing Latinos Are Missing From 65% Of Fortune 1000 Advice https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/lcda-releases-latest-latino-advice-monitor-revealing-latinos-are-missing-from-65-of-fortune-1000-advice/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 15:55:00 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/lcda-releases-latest-latino-advice-monitor-revealing-latinos-are-missing-from-65-of-fortune-1000-advice/ Fortune 1000 companies lack Latin American board representation, including Amazon, UnitedHealth Group, Berkshire Hathaway, AmerisourceBergen and others. WASHINGTON, September 23, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — As part of this year THE ATTITUDE business conference, Latin American Association of Corporate Directors (LCDA)the leading national organization promoting Hispanic/Latino representation on boards of directors, released its annual report, the Latino […]]]>

Fortune 1000 companies lack Latin American board representation, including Amazon, UnitedHealth Group, Berkshire Hathaway, AmerisourceBergen and others.

WASHINGTON, September 23, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — As part of this year THE ATTITUDE business conference, Latin American Association of Corporate Directors (LCDA)the leading national organization promoting Hispanic/Latino representation on boards of directors, released its annual report, the Latino Board Monitor 2022, revealing a lack of Hispanic/Latino representation on the nation’s top corporate boards. Latino directors are absent from 47% of Fortune 100 boards and 59% of Fortune 500 boards, while the Fortune 1000 fares worse with 65% of companies not having the Hispanic/Latino perspective.

“In a country where the Latin American GDP is $2.7 trillion, and, over the past 2 years, has grown twice as fast as the entire US economy, companies need that perspective on their boards. If companies want to grow and keep pace with this new mainstream economy, every board should immediately start placing Latinos on their board and in C-Suite positions…because that we all know that no one wants to be seen as leaving the money on the table,” said Sol Trujillo-International Business Executive/Founder & Chairman, Trujillo GroupLLC/President of the Latino Donor Collaborative (LDC)/Co-founder of L’ATTITUDE.

As reported in 2022, there have been no changes to the boards of Fortune 100 companies, with 53 Fortune 100 companies having Hispanic/Latino representation in the boardroom, indicating that a majority of most top companies in the country appreciate a Hispanic/Latino perspective in the boardroom. Alternatively, Amazon, Exxon Mobil, UnitedHealth Group, Berkshire Hathaway and AmerisourceBergen top the list of 47 Fortune 100 companies without Hispanics/Latinos on the board.

“A commitment to diversity and inclusion is incomplete without Latinos. 65% of Fortune 1000 boards have no Latino directors, even though 2 in 10 Americans are Latino. We contribute 25% of the GDP of the country and will bring 78% of net new workers into the workforce this decade. This needs to change,” noted Elizabeth Oliver Farrow, Chairman of the Board of LCDA; Director, Hispanic Communications Network LLC.

American Latinos are the second largest population group in the United States with a total of 62.1 million, but have the largest representation gap to close in the boardroom. Progress is being made to diversify the boardrooms of the S&P 500, with Black Americans holding 11% of total board seats and 26% of new appointments, and Asian Americans holding 6% of total board seats. Board seats and 10% of new appointments. Yet Hispanics/Latinos continue to be the least sought after for board seats, holding just 5% of total board seats and only 8% of new appointments.

LCDA continues to work to change the misperception that Latino business leaders are hard to find by providing boards with a trusted talent resource for experienced Latino directors and executives prepared for the boardroom.

The 2022 results reveal Latin American representation comprising 4.4% of Fortune 500 boards and 4.1% of Fortune 1000 boards. LCDA has influenced a rapid increase over the past two years, compared to the last decade. In the Fortune 500, the representation of Latinos increased from 0.7% over a 2-year period to 1.1% over a 10-year period.

“The number of Latinos on boards is so small, and we keep hearing that organizations can’t find qualified candidates. With our growing network of LCDA members, we’ve proven that there is enough supply, and that excuse no longer applies. Despite this qualified pool, Latinos have long been systematically excluded and bypassed. This is unacceptable in 21st century America,” said Esther AguileraPresident and CEO, Latino Corporate Directors Association (LCDA)

Each year, LCDA will release a board audit of Latin American representation at Fortune 1000 companies in conjunction with the ATTITUDE CEO conference.

About the Association of Latin American Corporate Directors

The Latino Corporate Directors Association (LCDA) is a national organization that promotes C-level and board diversity to maximize business success. LCDA serves as an advocate and resource for boards of directors, research firms, private equity and institutional investors interested in gaining access to exceptional Latino talent. Our program areas focus on growing the supply of high caliber board candidates and providing quality corporate governance programs for experienced and aspiring directors.

Contact:
Monique Navarre
(915) 790-7788
[email protected]

SOURCE Association of Latin American Corporate Directors

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State organization honors Olathe East SRO for bravery in school shooting https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/state-organization-honors-olathe-east-sro-for-bravery-in-school-shooting/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:55:00 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/state-organization-honors-olathe-east-sro-for-bravery-in-school-shooting/ OLATHE, Kan. (KCTV) – A local school resource officer is eyeing a host of honors for his response to an active shooter this spring. School Resource Officer Erik Clark accepted an award for bravery Tuesday night from a group close to his heart. On March 4, parents rushed to Olathe East High School in a […]]]>

OLATHE, Kan. (KCTV) – A local school resource officer is eyeing a host of honors for his response to an active shooter this spring.

School Resource Officer Erik Clark accepted an award for bravery Tuesday night from a group close to his heart.

On March 4, parents rushed to Olathe East High School in a panic to pick up their children. No one knows if the teenage student accused of firing the first shots would have continued past the office if school resource officer Erik Clark had not intervened.

Tuesday night’s award for bravery came from the Kansas Juvenile Officers Association, which includes SROs and DARE officers. It is not an annual award as some organizations have done.

“This is actually the first time we’ve given this award,” said Officer Anthony Garcia, a Blue Valley School District SRO who serves as the organization‘s vice president. “But these acts of bravery by Officer Clark simply could not go unnoticed. So we felt we had to put something in place for him.

Clark had previously been honored at the United States Capitol and received the National Award of Valor from the National Association of School Resource Officers. Yet Olathe Police Department Public Information Service Sgt. Joel Yeldell said Tuesday’s price could be even more significant.

“This one is particularly special because they are his peers. It is SRO colleagues in Kansas who recognize this work. So I think it really gets to him,” Yeldell said.

Yeldell spoke on Clark’s behalf because the shooting is part of an ongoing criminal case and he was asked not to speak about it publicly.

Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe charged the student, Jaylon Elmore, with attempted capital murder. He was 18 at the time. This case is still making its way through the courts.

In a document, in which Howe ruled that Clark’s use of force was justified, Howe wrote that Deputy Warden Dr. Kaleb Stoppel had received information that Elmore had a gun in his backpack. back. So he went to the teenager’s classroom and asked him to come to the office. Once at the office, Howe writes, Elmore was asked to empty his backpack. He refused, then pulled out the gun and fired, hitting Clark. Howe wrote that Stoppel then tackled Elmore and Clark fought back.

Clark, Stoppel and Elmore were all hit by gunfire and have all since been released from the hospital.

Clark returned to Olathe East this fall to continue what he has been doing for seven years at school. Yeldell said Clark was eager to return and the whole department was happy to see him back in uniform.

“It’s a tight-knit group there,” Yeldell said. “I think every time people go through something traumatic they bond even closer, so it’s a very special family in Olathe East.”

Stoppel and Clark were honored in Washington, D.C. earlier this year when a Kansas Congressional delegation from the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives presented resolutions recognizing them for their actions. The delegation included US Senators Jerry Moran and Roger Marshall, as well as Representatives Sharice Davids, Tracey Mann and Jake LaTurner.

Yeldell has called fall and winter “awards season” for many local, state and national police organizations. He said he wouldn’t be surprised if Clark got more awards.

Previous cover:

Injured school resource officer in Olathe East fought back at work

Teen charged in Olathe East High School shooting attends court hearing

Local school safety questioned after Texas shooting

Officer involved in Olathe East shooting receives national award

Olathe East HS shooting suspect Jaylon Elmore discharged from hospital and booked

Hearing for student charged in Olathe East shooting pushed back to April 28

New details released in Olathe East High School shooting that injured 3 people

Affidavit details murder of three people at Kansas school

Local psychologists discuss the trauma created by shootings like those in Olathe East

18-year-old charged with attempted capital murder in Olathe East shooting

Olathe school resource officer credited with saving lives identified by agencies

Parents and children reunite after a chilling shooting at Olathe East High School

2 released from hospital after shooting at Olathe East High School

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These 2 West Michigan Schools Receive Blue Ribbon Status for 2022 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/these-2-west-michigan-schools-receive-blue-ribbon-status-for-2022/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 04:00:35 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/these-2-west-michigan-schools-receive-blue-ribbon-status-for-2022/ Two western Michigan schools have been named National Blue Ribbon Schools for 2022. The two schools are the only ones in the state to receive the honor for 2022. What is a Blue Ribbon School? In 1982, Secretary of Education Terrel H. Bell established the Blue Ribbon National Schools Award bring public attention to exemplary […]]]>

Two western Michigan schools have been named National Blue Ribbon Schools for 2022.

The two schools are the only ones in the state to receive the honor for 2022.

What is a Blue Ribbon School?

In 1982, Secretary of Education Terrel H. Bell established the Blue Ribbon National Schools Award bring public attention to exemplary American schools and recognize schools whose students have thrived and excelled. In collaboration with the National Association of Elementary School Principals and the National Association of Secondary School Principals, Bell launched the National Blue Ribbon Schools and the National Distinguished Principals Programs. Both programs highlighted outstanding models of American schools and school leadership.

What does it take to be a Blue Ribbon school?

The National Blue Ribbon Schools Program accepts nominations from public and non-public schools that meet one of two criteria:

  • Exemplary high-performing schools are among the top-performing schools in their state, as measured by state assessments or nationally standardized tests.
  • Schools that close exemplary achievement gaps are among the top performing schools in their state in closing achievement gaps between a school’s subgroups and all students over the past five years.

Eligible schools must have been in existence for five years and cannot have received the award in the previous five years.

Must have excellence in academics, arts and athletics.

Which state has the most Blue Ribbon schools for 2022?

Marshall Elementary and Brown Elementary Blue Ribbon Schools for 2022

According WZZM 13, Marshall Elementary won blue ribbon in 2016.

Elemental Brown won blue ribbon in 2015.

UP NEXT: 11 Michigan celebrities and where they went to high school

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young selected as young leader of the KY Soybean Association | WPKY 103.3 FM https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/young-selected-as-young-leader-of-the-ky-soybean-association-wpky-103-3-fm/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:13:48 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/young-selected-as-young-leader-of-the-ky-soybean-association-wpky-103-3-fm/ Photo Credit: Kentucky Soybeans/Facebook Catlin Young of Caldwell County has been selected as a Corteva Agriscience Young Leader of the American Soybean Association (ASA) of Kentucky. Kentucky Soybean officials made the announcement Wednesday on social media and said the national program allows young soybean farmers across the country to come together for an empowering leadership […]]]>
Photo Credit: Kentucky Soybeans/Facebook

Catlin Young of Caldwell County has been selected as a Corteva Agriscience Young Leader of the American Soybean Association (ASA) of Kentucky.

Kentucky Soybean officials made the announcement Wednesday on social media and said the national program allows young soybean farmers across the country to come together for an empowering leadership experience. The Young Leaders program offers participants the opportunity to improve their leadership skills as well as meet and learn from other young leaders.

According to the message, the Young Leaders program is unique among the leadership opportunities that exist for soybean farmers because it is designed to include partners in the role of “significant other” in the training. Couples will attend sessions together so both sides understand the importance of helping to shape national policy and champion agriculture, and have the tools to do so.

The ad says Young grew soybeans on his own farm this year, in addition to helping out on his grandfather’s Lively H farms. Young’s partner, Aaron Vinson, works full-time on his grandfather’s farm, while Young works at the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center at Princeton. She graduated from the Hutson School of Agriculture at Murray State University with a degree in Agriscience/Agribusiness.

In addition to soybeans, Young would have a flock of sheep. She has owned her farm for just over a year and says she has already registered with Caldwell County EQUIP and uses several best management practices including cover crops, non- ploughing, pasture management, a pipeline for livestock watering, and planting pollinator habitats.

As part of Young’s status as an ASA Corteva Agriscience Young Leader of Kentucky, she will serve as an ex-officio member of the Kentucky Soybean Association Board of Directors.

Officials say the Young Leader duties begin in late November when the pair travel to Johnston, Iowa, Corteva’s headquarters, for the first part of a two-part training session. Part two will take place in March at the Commodity Classic in Orlando, Florida, which is the annual meeting of the American Soybean Association, National Corn Growers Association, National Association of Wheat Growers and National Sorghum Producers.

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Florida Trucking Association Highlights Truck Driver Appreciation Week https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/florida-trucking-association-highlights-truck-driver-appreciation-week/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 23:31:41 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/florida-trucking-association-highlights-truck-driver-appreciation-week/ Last year, the American Trucking Association reported that the shortage of truck drivers had risen to 80,000. The Florida Trucking Association helps celebrate this National Truck Driver Appreciation Week. The annual event, which runs from Sunday to Saturday, takes on particular significance this year, as global supply chain issues continue to underscore the importance of […]]]>

Last year, the American Trucking Association reported that the shortage of truck drivers had risen to 80,000.

The Florida Trucking Association helps celebrate this National Truck Driver Appreciation Week.

The annual event, which runs from Sunday to Saturday, takes on particular significance this year, as global supply chain issues continue to underscore the importance of the trucking industry.

“About 85% of Florida communities rely exclusively on trucks to move their goods; almost everything we depend on in daily life is made possible by our country’s professional truckers,” said Alix Miller, president and CEO of the Florida Trucking Association. “National Trucker Appreciation Week is an important time to thank professional truckers for their hard work and dedication to undertaking one of the most critical jobs in our economy.

There are more than 3.6 million professional truck drivers nationwide, with more than 500,000 commercial driver license holders in Florida. Truckers deliver goods and products ranging from food and fuel to medicine and clothing. They transport more than 10 billion tons of goods and products each year, which represents 70% of the country’s total annual freight.

The Florida Trucking Association has promoted and protected the state’s trucking industry for nearly 90 years. FTA is the only state liaison between the trucking industry and the legislative, regulatory and judicial branches of the state and federal government.

In October 2021, the American Trucking Association reported that the shortage of truck drivers had increased to 80,000, an absolute record for the industry. The organization estimates that the shortage could exceed 160,000 by 2030.

“One thing to note about the shortage is that before the pandemic we were adding drivers to the industry – even though we had a shortage, more people were entering the industry,” the chief economist said. of the ATA. Bob Costello said. “The problem is that new entrants to the industry have not kept up with the demand for goods.”

Govt. Ron DeSantis has made it a point to stimulate the trucking industry in Florida. The Governor’s Office has awarded millions for truck driving education, including $3.2 million last year for Florida State College in Jacksonville to support 120 trucking graduates per year.


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Croatian National Association of Caterers welcomes government measures https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/croatian-national-association-of-caterers-welcomes-government-measures/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 23:01:25 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/croatian-national-association-of-caterers-welcomes-government-measures/ September 10, 2022 – The Croatian National Association of Caterers has welcomed the package of economic measures that the government has introduced to combat inflation and spiraling energy bills. As Morsky Writing on Thursday, the Croatian National Association of Caterers welcomed the set of measures introduced by the Croatian government following drastic increases in the […]]]>

September 10, 2022 – The Croatian National Association of Caterers has welcomed the package of economic measures that the government has introduced to combat inflation and spiraling energy bills.

As Morsky Writing on Thursday, the Croatian National Association of Caterers welcomed the set of measures introduced by the Croatian government following drastic increases in the energy bill which, in recent months, have posed a huge danger to the survival of already exhausted by the disastrous effects of the global coronavirus pandemic.

This is especially true for those operating in the restaurant, hotel and tourism sector, which are mostly micro, small and medium enterprises and enterprises, notes the press release of the aforementioned association.

Among the government’s package of measures, the Croatian National Association of Caterers singled out the electricity cost cap measure and the measure that aims to increase the amount of tax-free payments to employees, which, as they pointed out, will allow the continuation of work on the catering and reception establishments this winter, as well as contributing to the preservation of jobs.

They assessed that by limiting the cost of electricity for the half-yearly consumption of businesses up to 250,000 kWh to 0.53 kuna/kWh, which ensures a price 12 times cheaper than the stock market price, the Ministry of Economy and Sustainable Development highlighted “an unprecedented level of understanding and support for micro, small and medium-sized enterprises that are going through the most difficult times when doing business, and which at the same time constitute the ‘backbone of the national economy.’

The Croatian National Association of Caterers has also said it hopes for successful negotiations and equal treatment regarding the limitation of the price of gas, which, together with electricity, is an essential source of energy in the industry. hotel business, especially in the region of mainland Croatia in the winter period of the year.

Given the scale and long-term nature of this ongoing and ongoing crisis and the limited resources, they also call for the implementation of cost-saving measures and the rationalization of energy consumption in the professional and private spheres, as reported HRT.

To learn more, be sure to check out our business section.

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Catholic nurses view their work as a vocation, a ministry of healing https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/catholic-nurses-view-their-work-as-a-vocation-a-ministry-of-healing/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 15:37:10 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/catholic-nurses-view-their-work-as-a-vocation-a-ministry-of-healing/ Nurses discuss patient care at SSM Health St. Anthony’s Hospital in Oklahoma City in 2021 amid the coronavirus pandemic. (SNC photo by Nick Oxford/Reuters) Nursing is more than a profession for Jamie Shephard, a licensed practical nurse in the Buffalo area. On the contrary, Shephard’s nursing work is a way to live out her strong […]]]>

Nurses discuss patient care at SSM Health St. Anthony’s Hospital in Oklahoma City in 2021 amid the coronavirus pandemic. (SNC photo by Nick Oxford/Reuters)

Nursing is more than a profession for Jamie Shephard, a licensed practical nurse in the Buffalo area.

On the contrary, Shephard’s nursing work is a way to live out her strong Catholic faith. When he and other nurses, doctors and medical professionals attend to patients, they extend Jesus’ care, love and compassion to those people, he said.

“(We) have the opportunity to step into the healing ministry of Jesus, to be a continuation of his healing presence in the world,” Shephard explained.

Catholic nurses, health professions are united by a common mission, professional organizations

Shepherd is not alone in this belief. In early August, he was one of more than 200 medics who traveled to Doylestown, Pennsylvania for the 2022 World Congress of Catholic Nurseswhich attracted participants from all over the world.

Held every four years, the World Congress is a gathering of members of the International Catholic Committee of Nurses and Medical-Social Assistants, known by the French acronym CICIAMS. Founded in 1933 in Lourdes, France, CICIAMS brings together various organizations of Catholic nurses and other health professionals from around the world and works closely with the Vatican Dicastery for the Promotion of Integral Human Development, as well as the Dicastery for the Laity, Family and Life. , and the Vatican Secretariat of State.

One of the member organizations of CICIAMS is the National Association of Catholic Nurses, USA, or NACN-USA, which hosted the Doylestown event at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa. The World Congress of Catholic Nurses had not been held in the United States since 1990, according to Maria Arvonio, president-elect of NACN-USA

“All quadrants – Asia, Africa, Europe, Americas – are competing to host him. It is a great honor that the United States has been chosen to host him,” said Arvonio, who also served as vice -chair of the August event planning committee.

Cardinal Turkson: Catholic Nurses and Health Care Professionals Exercise a ‘Noble Ministry’

The theme for World Congress 2022 was “United in Mission. United in faith. Speakers at the three-day event included Immaculate Ilibagiza, a survivor of the 1994 Rwandan genocide who became an internationally renowned speaker and author, and Cardinal Peter Turkson, Chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and the Academy Pontifical Institute of Social Sciences of the Vatican.

In his remarks after the opening Mass of the congress Aug. 2, Cardinal Turkson urged Catholic nurses and medical professionals in attendance to come together to “support and strengthen one another in your profession.” The cardinal said the fragile and vulnerable nature of human beings provides opportunities for nurses and medical professionals to exercise a “noble ministry or profession.”

“These are people who have managed to transcend their vulnerabilities to be able to provide antidotes and solutions to those who are suffering,” Cardinal Turkson said.

The organization provides resources and a support system for Catholic nurses

Catholic nurses do this because they view nursing as a mission rather than a profession, noted Joanne Critelli, a Rochester nurse who is leading local efforts to create a Rochester chapter of NACN-USA.

“For us, nursing is not just a job. It is a ministry. You are the heart, the hands, the feet of Christ,” Critelli said.

Although neither Rochester nor Buffalo have designated NACN-USA chapters, Critelli and Shephard both belong to the organization as individual members, along with a handful of other local Catholic nurses. The NACN-USA website includes a wealth of resources for Catholic nurses who want to enrich their spirituality or learn more about church teachings regarding issues they might face in their work, Critelli said. .

“This is where nursing, ministry and Catholic mission meet. It is the voice of nurses in life and their nursing care, and support comes to them in their profession from the National Association of Catholic Nurses. You have to be supported somehow,” she said.

The support of fellow NACN-USA members has been invaluable, especially during the past few years of unprecedented challenges as the world grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic, Shephard said. Events such as the World Congress of Catholic Nurses and smaller NACN-USA events provide opportunities to build friendships with others who view their work in health care as a calling.

“You just meet people from all over the world and very quickly it becomes a family of faith,” Shephard explained. “We know we have brothers and sisters around the world who have become friends and are part of this family of faith who share in this great healing ministry of Jesus.”

Key words: Health

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Wastewater monitoring becomes more targeted in the search for poliomyelitis, monkeypox and Covid-19 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/wastewater-monitoring-becomes-more-targeted-in-the-search-for-poliomyelitis-monkeypox-and-covid-19/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 22:40:00 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/wastewater-monitoring-becomes-more-targeted-in-the-search-for-poliomyelitis-monkeypox-and-covid-19/ In the United States, some disease sleuths are scaling back their wastewater monitoring efforts to focus on specific buildings and identify hotspots for a growing list of diseases. “Some wastewater monitoring is done at the community level, and some at the building level, which is a little more nuanced in terms of message targeting,” said […]]]>

In the United States, some disease sleuths are scaling back their wastewater monitoring efforts to focus on specific buildings and identify hotspots for a growing list of diseases.

“Some wastewater monitoring is done at the community level, and some at the building level, which is a little more nuanced in terms of message targeting,” said Lori Tremmel Freeman, executive director of the National Association of County. and municipal health officials.

“For example, in some of our jurisdictions they will monitor a large hotel or a prison,” she said. “If it spawns there, you can target messaging directly to that building.”

A building-level wastewater monitoring approach is underway at all 11 hospitals in the NYC Health + Hospitals integrated healthcare system in New York City.

The system launched a monitoring program in February to test sewage for coronavirus and influenza viruses in wastewater from its hospitals, and the program expanded in August to include testing for poliomyelitis and monkeypox, according to a company announcement.

“With rapid testing increasing and federal funding for Covid response declining this spring, sewage testing was an affordable and easy way for us to track the presence of Covid in the community without the need for patients to pass. a test,” Dr. Mitchell Katz, president and CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals, said in the announcement. “Now, with the arrival of monkeypox and polio in New York, we have a system in place to test for these viruses and use that data to inform our response.”

‘A good secondary backup’

The health system‘s surveillance program successfully identified Covid-19 and influenza viruses in wastewater from its NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst hospital up to two weeks before viral infections were clinically identified among hospital patients, said Leopolda Silvera, global health assistant at NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst.

Using data from the sewage tests, “we were able to say about 10 to 14 days before when we’re going to see our patients coming in sick,” Silvera said.

“People clear the virus when they use the bathroom,” she said. “So if we test our sewage, then we can tell whether or not there is an increase in the virus in the community at that particular time. And then it ends up showing when people start showing symptoms 10 to 14 days later.”

Silvera described wastewater monitoring data as giving clinicians a warning signal of a potential increase or decrease in disease, which can help inform efforts to prevent or treat disease and increase staff and supplies to meet needs.

Queens College research assistant Sherin Kannoly collects a sewage sample from a manhole on the grounds of NYC Health + Hospitals/Queens.
With the ongoing global monkeypox outbreak and a recent detection of poliovirus in New York City sewage samples, Silvera said it was “natural” that NYC Health’s sewage monitoring program + Hospitals is evolving to include testing for these viruses.

“If we can get direct tests from our patients, like our Covid tests, that’s our primary way of being able to treat and know what’s going on with our patient population,” she said. “But having our sewage monitoring is a good secondary safeguard for us to know what’s going on in our community and so we can plan accordingly.”

Seeking to understand in waste water

Wastewater monitoring involves test sewage determine if feces and other types of human waste in untreated sewage contain genetic material from viruses or bacteria that can make people sick. This material, either RNA or DNA, can be detected in wastewater – but it does not indicate whether the pathogen is infectious in the water itself.
Health officials urge New Yorkers to get vaccinated after poliovirus detected in another county's sewage
“We’re really focused on understanding the burden of disease and the extent of illness in the community with these measures,” said Marlene Wolfe, assistant professor of environmental health at Emory University and Co-Principal Investigator of WastewaterSCAN, a national wastewater monitoring initiative.

“Sewage monitoring, the reason it works so well is because everyone in the community contributes their sample to the sewer system daily,” she said. “For some places it could be that most of the population of the county contributes to that one factory, and for some places it might be that even in a single city there are multiple factories that cover different parts of the population. . “

Then, of course, there could be building-level monitoring, like in a hospital.

Sampling wastewater at different levels within a community can range from “the treatment plant being the highest level down to an individual building,” Wolfe said. “There is also a kind of intermediate level, which is in the sewer network.”

Sewage is the latest disease detection tool for Covid-19 - and more
Wastewater monitoring dates from the 1940swhen researchers used it to find carriers of the bacteria that causes typhoid fever or detect poliomyelitis.

Since then, sewage monitoring has been used to help track infectious diseases globally – but the technique was far from common before the emergence of Covid-19. This coronavirus is the first respiratory virus tracked with sewage, Wolfe said.

In response to the pandemic, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the National Wastewater Monitoring System in September 2020. Local public health departments use it to submit their wastewater test data to the CDC. The system analyzes this data and reports the results to the health services to use in their Covid-19 response.
Wastewater monitoring for Covid-19 is gaining momentum in the United States
A survey of 194 leaders of local public health agencies, published by the Rockefeller Foundation in April found that although 38% had monitored sewage for the virus that causes Covid-19 at some point in the pandemic, only 21% said they were likely to monitor their sewage after the end of the pandemic.

“This Rockefeller survey was really well done, but most of the surveys were done before the Omicron surge. This surge was a time when we anecdotally saw a significant increase in interest from health services public using the information and the media and the public showing interest in the data as a trusted source,” Wolfe said.

She hopes that wastewater monitoring can continue to be used as a public health tool.

Covid-19 wastewater monitoring is a promising tool, but critical challenges remain

The WastewaterSCAN initiative, based at Stanford University and completely separate from the CDC system, was launched in November 2020 to analyze wastewater samples for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19 . Since then, the program has expanded to monitor more treatment plants and track more pathogens.

Since last week, the initiative – which involves a partnership between universities, nonprofits and research firm Verily – has been monitoring 48 treatment plants in 16 states for the coronavirus and its BA.4 subvariants and BA.5, as well as monkeypox, influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus.

When new threats emerge, it’s “relatively easy” to use sewage samples from the initiative to immediately test whatever that threat is, Wolfe said.

“That’s what we’ve been able to do recently for monkeypox, which was really exciting because we were able to deploy it very quickly, and we’ve seen in a number of places, including Atlanta, that we have detectable monkeypox DNA in the sewage from when we started surveillance, which was quite early in the outbreak,” she said. “That’s the benefit of having this kind of population-level network that allows us to talk about general trends in infectious disease outbreaks.”

“If you’re not looking for something, you won’t see it”

Wastewater monitoring proved useful at a time when it was critical to monitor pathogens not typically seen in the United States, such as poliomyelitis and monkeypox, said Dr. Daniel Rhoads, co-chair of the College of American Pathologists Microbiology. Committee.

Clinically, in the United States, “we stopped testing for polio because the polio was gone. We never tested for monkeypox because it’s a zoonotic disease in an endemic area of ​​Africa, so we didn’t even need to worry about it one day today,” said Rhoads, who is also a pathologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.

Still, wastewater monitoring “opens our eyes collectively – in medicine, public health and society – and makes us realize that if you’re not looking for something, you won’t see it,” Rhoads said.

“With monitoring in general – and perhaps wastewater monitoring in particular – I expect there will be more metagenomic analysis of wastewater where people are not looking for a specific pathogen. They’re just looking to see what’s in it and is there anything surprising in it. And so, as a society, we shouldn’t be too surprised that there are pathogens that we haven’t recognised,” he said. “I hope this kind of surveillance will enlighten us, and then we can develop tools to help at an individual level to diagnose and possibly treat these emerging diseases caused by these pathogens. »
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USM College Panhellenic Association Chapter Achieves National Recognition https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/usm-college-panhellenic-association-chapter-achieves-national-recognition/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 20:09:00 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/usm-college-panhellenic-association-chapter-achieves-national-recognition/ From the Department of Communications at the University of Southern Mississippi HATTIESBURG, Miss. (WDAM) – The University of Southern Mississippi The College Panhellenic Association Chapter has won National Awards for Innovation in Leadership, Programming and Marketing from the National Panhellenic Council for the 2021-22 academic year. College Pan-Hellenic Associations are affiliates of the NPC created […]]]>

From the Department of Communications at the University of Southern Mississippi

HATTIESBURG, Miss. (WDAM) – The University of Southern Mississippi The College Panhellenic Association Chapter has won National Awards for Innovation in Leadership, Programming and Marketing from the National Panhellenic Council for the 2021-22 academic year.

College Pan-Hellenic Associations are affiliates of the NPC created to enable cooperation among women-only sororities on campus.

Each University Pan-Hellenic Association is student-run and composed of all NPC member sorority chapters on the respective campus. They were eligible to receive recognition for their work in the areas of academic innovation, community impact, legal process, leadership, marketing, programming, and recruitment.

“These Pan-Hellenic College Associations have excelled in the areas of council success and community support,” said Linda Henderson, Chair of the 2020-22 Pan-Hellenic College Committee. “We are pleased to recognize these associations and their member chapters for excellence and innovation in Pan-Hellenic operations during the preceding academic year. The success of these Pan-Hellenic colleges demonstrates that there is a bright future ahead of them for their associations and the wider Pan-Hellenic community.

In addition, to receive an “Award of Excellence” or an “Award of Innovation”, the Panhellenic College must demonstrate a set of basic Panhellenic competencies, such as adherence to the unanimous agreements and policies of the NPC, adherence to contribution and reporting deadlines and retention of NPC information and contacts. up-to-date database.

“Watching these amazing students develop their leadership skills and work hard behind the scenes is one thing – seeing them get this level of recognition for their dedication is a whole new level of pride,” said Hannah Scott Back, Pan-Hellenic Coordinator and Council. the university. advisor to the USM Office of Brotherhood and Sisterhood. “They knew the challenges ahead of them and faced each one with confidence and an open mind. Our CPC Board of Directors and the entire Pan-Hellenic community have truly embraced our mission of ‘Embrace’. .Empower.’ over the past year.

“As not only their advisor, but myself an alumnus of the Miss South sorority, I couldn’t be prouder.”

Laura Laughlin, director of the Office of Brotherhood and Sisterhood, agreed.

“Fraternity and Sorority Life is very proud of our hard-working students,” said Laughlin. “The executive members of our College Panhellenic Council (CPC) are innovative and proven to be dedicated to improving the sorority community. Our office appreciates their service and we congratulate them on their many accomplishments. I can’t wait to see what they do this semester.

NPC is the largest organization championing the women-only sorority experience and is the trade association of 26 national and international sororities. NPC sororities are located on nearly 670 campuses with more than 375,000 undergraduate members in more than 3,350 chapters. Alumni are represented in nearly 3,500 associations around the world.

For more information, including a full list of NPC sororities, visit npcwomen.org

For more information on fraternity and sorority life at USM, click HERE.

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