Mental connection – Gloucester Downtown Association http://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:55:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Mental connection – Gloucester Downtown Association http://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/ 32 32 Forbes India – Using Sports Psychology to Succeed in Everyday Life https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/forbes-india-using-sports-psychology-to-succeed-in-everyday-life/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:55:15 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/forbes-india-using-sports-psychology-to-succeed-in-everyday-life/ The principles of sports psychology not only help improve sports performance, but are also useful in real life. Image: Shutterstock /> All achievements in life require motivation. For example, the will to perform a task requires motivation to trigger initiative. And, in sports, maintaining a balanced motivation is key to accomplishing tasks to create a […]]]>

The principles of sports psychology not only help improve sports performance, but are also useful in real life. Image: Shutterstock

/>

All achievements in life require motivation. For example, the will to perform a task requires motivation to trigger initiative. And, in sports, maintaining a balanced motivation is key to accomplishing tasks to create a successful outcome. The key word here is “balanced” motivation. High levels of motivation can become the cause of anxiety and stress, while low levels of motivation can make a person completely hopeless and inactive.

Athletes are nurtured by setting clear goals. A facade is usually created by social media that only shows athletes winning moments that are full of motivation and excitement. It fails to shine a light on their concerted effort and struggle to outmaneuver the formation to get where they are. He also fails to show the weak moments, with lack of motivation, waning confidence and insane pressure. As in a recent interview with Forbes India, Virat Kohli, said, “Everyone feels pressure and nervous, because your mind is playing tricks on you. If anyone can claim they’ve never been under pressure, that would be a lie.

Although most athletes possess natural talents, certain motivating factors drive them to success. From a psychological point of view, humans need competence, autonomy and connection. It develops from positive justification. To meet these needs, athletes work hard and achieve success. Moreover, other motivating factors that can motivate sports action are intrinsic and extrinsic in nature. This means that motivation comes from inside a person or from outside – the environment. Intrinsic factors include feelings of accomplishment and success, pleasure or joy; while extrinsic factors include ego gratification, earning a reward, or forcefully achieving a goal.

Athletes are motivated to develop and improve the superior skills intrinsic to winning. There can be many reasons when a drop in motivation occurs and anxiety sets in, such as when a young athlete faces an older, well-trained athlete, or when one is not totally confident of succeeding.. Here, questions of health and diet and practice are essential. Sports psychologists recommend that mental exercises are as important for success as physical fitness.

Therefore, practicing relaxation techniques, rhythmic breathing, visualization techniques diligently in the pre-performance routine is essential to becoming mentally strong and challenged at this time.

Athletes devote much of their time and energy to maximizing their physical condition and technical skills. Winners are also in control of their mental fitness, says Jeremy Sutton, a psychologist and researcher in the field of human capacity on mental and physical limits. Psychological variables are factors that make it possible to exceed the limits or to exceed them. Therefore, the psychological variables must be in phase with the physical variables. As sports psychologist Aidan Moran said, “Sports are played in the body and won in the mind.”

Gary Kristen, a former South African cricketer and coach of the Indian cricket team, in his recent interview with The Cricket Couch, spoke about the importance of mental toughness in winning a match. He said: “What you do is try to prepare players as well as you mentally can for competition, prepare them as well as you physically can for competition. A lot of things happen in the net, they hit a lot of balls, they put in a lot of physical training and tangible effort and the focus is on mental training, so we spent some time on that.

Some widely considered sports psychological factors that affect athlete performance are:

(1) mental stamina: Mentally strong athletes can persevere despite setbacks, difficulties and stressful situations. They remain unwavering in their self-confidence. The number of failures only galvanizes more spirit to rise despite the obstacles to performance – they always come back stronger. Virat Kohli, in his interview with Forbes India, also mentions his strong belief system while taking risks. “You have to take a leap of faith and take risks to succeed. If you don’t, you could still do well but you would be confined to a circle. Then you stop learning and growing,” Kohli said.

(2) Commitment: Athletes as successful athletes stay committed to their goals and programs. Any slowdown or emotional setback is not able to distract them from their goals.

(3) Goal setting and focus: Goal setting draws attention to actions and brings maximum results. This map is the potential for an athlete to effectively navigate to align with enhanced actions. Therefore, it also creates a feeling of satisfaction. Michael Sheard, Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology at Teesside and York St John’s University, explains in his book, Mental Toughness, “Goal setting is associated with increased well-being – it represents an individual’s efforts to achieve personal change, enhanced meaning, and purpose in life.A realistic goal allows for a positive strategy, because thinking about it should feel like it can be done. It maintains high levels of focus and motivation because actions are viewed as tiny, achievable components.

(4) Anxiety and motivation: Athletes feel anxious when faced with pressure from many sides – their opponents, coaches, team members, pressure to perform better, etc. Sports psychologists offer many mental exercises to ward off anxiety so you can be better prepared for every match. Visualizing yourself playing the game and planning every move in the mind before the game on the court is said to increase real-time performance. Additionally, positive self-talk is able to build belief and self-confidence. Also, meditation techniques such as slowing down, relaxation, and breathing at critical times can increase focus and improve performance when needed.

To conclude, the principles of sports psychology not only help improve sports performance but are also useful in real life. It may be necessary to think about these factors to pursue their goals and plans, because in real life too, we are always in competition and striving to achieve something. As academic philosopher David Papineau points out, Sporting prowess has a lot to teach us about how our minds work. In short, reaching the top requires a series of smaller goals and actions performed on a regular basis. Along with this, psychological tools such as the right mindset, motivation, self-confidence, and the “can do” mindset can shape the waves of athletic performance.

The author is a researcher at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, pursuing his research studies in the field of psychology and neuroscience.

The thoughts and opinions shared here are those of the author.

Discover our end of season subscription discounts with an absolutely free Moneycontrol pro subscription. Use code EOSO2021. Click here for more details.

]]>
Getting Medicare Advantage members to enjoy plan benefits https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/getting-medicare-advantage-members-to-enjoy-plan-benefits/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:00:34 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/getting-medicare-advantage-members-to-enjoy-plan-benefits/ There’s no denying that getting Medicare Advantage members to take action on their health gives them a better chance of improving their health outcomes, but getting there can be a significant challenge. That said, there’s one thing all Medicare Advantage plans should be doing to keep their members healthy and their plan visible in an […]]]>

There’s no denying that getting Medicare Advantage members to take action on their health gives them a better chance of improving their health outcomes, but getting there can be a significant challenge.

That said, there’s one thing all Medicare Advantage plans should be doing to keep their members healthy and their plan visible in an increasingly competitive market: Educate members about plan benefits they may not know about. even be that they have, and encourage them to use those benefits.

Here are several reasons why plans should educate plan members about plan benefits:

  • It connects members to services that can directly lead to better health. The overarching goal, of course, is to keep member populations as healthy as possible, which also leads to the benefit of better health plan financial performance.
  • This builds trust and appreciation among members. Learning about plan benefits and features that they might have otherwise overlooked can come as a pleasant surprise to members, ultimately leading to higher levels of satisfaction and retention.
  • It keeps health plans competitive by showcasing the breadth of services they offer. Communicating attractive benefits to members and encouraging trial of those benefits can also lead to positive word-of-mouth referrals, retention, and new sign-ups.
  • It offers members a positive way to engage with their health plan. Instead of using their insurance card at a doctor’s or provider’s office, members log into the health plan for a more positive experience to meet their specific needs.

Benefits MA Members May Not Know About

With this in mind, here is a non-exhaustive list of benefits offered by many plans, but which many members may not know they have available to them:

  • Free or reduced-rate high-speed Internet: Eighty percent of low-income households eligible for discounted broadband don’t realize it. Providing members with devices (computers or smartphones), education (visits and basic training), and support (technical assistance) increases digital access and literacy, giving members a new, easy way to take action on their health .
  • Transportation: A number of Medicare Advantage plans cover non-emergency transportation, including trips to a doctor’s office or clinic. Plans may also cover ride-sharing services such as Uber or Lyft for transportation to medical appointments or fitness centers.
  • Gym Memberships: Gym memberships are often available through Medicare Advantage plans, as is SilverSneakers, a health and fitness program for seniors. These programs can offer both online and in-person fitness classes, giving members an array of options to stay in shape.
  • Meal delivery: Meals on wheels delivery is an option with many Medicare Advantage plans, especially for members with chronic conditions. Some plans also cover healthy food options and transportation to and from grocery stores.
  • Caregiver and daycare services for adults: Sick or disabled adults are eligible for home care services that help them avoid having to move to a nursing home, while adult day care services are helpful in getting members out for the day. In addition, the All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) Program provides some members with home and community care services, including adult child care.

How to get members to take action

It’s one thing to understand how important it is to educate members about the services they have available to them, but it’s another to do it effectively, leading to trial and error. adoption of these benefits. Top-tier plans not only give members an enticing list of benefits to use, but they also use smart engagement strategies to encourage members to take advantage of them.

Plans can keep members active in different ways, but there are three key things they need to keep in mind:

1. Show empathy to members. One thing that has become clear in the more than two years of the pandemic is that health plans need to fully understand and recognize what their members are going through in order to connect with them effectively.

Plans are a vital connection point between members and their well-being; showing members how a health plan can help meet their very specific needs is powerful. Plans must demonstrate to members that they are committed to more than their premiums by focusing on health and safety and giving them the tools and information they need to navigate these still uncertain times.

2. Optimize engagement with members. Optimizing communications with members involves a lot, but communication is not synonymous with action. One of the main ways to optimize engagement is to provide members with the most relevant information using the means of communication they prefer at the right time and with the right message.

Communication channels vary by member and include everything from text messages and emails to traditional mail, live agents and IVR. Entering a communication channel that respects member preferences goes a long way in creating and building trust and satisfaction.

3. Don’t assume that one size fits all. Plans that engage with every member in the same way—a mass text message or a physical direct mail, for example⁠—will see little ROI. Instead, predictive analytics and rules engines can be used to identify a member’s preferred channel (such as a phone call, text or email) and the frequency of communication with each individual to create the best chance of it happening.

Competition in the Medicare Advantage space is fierce. Attracting new members and keeping existing members enrolled are challenges that every plan faces. Informing members of services they may not know they can access and doing so with an effective engagement strategy is a winning combination that gives plans the best chance of success.

Photo: designer491, Getty Images

]]>
Nutrition with Jane McClenaghan: Eat better to support your mental health https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/nutrition-with-jane-mcclenaghan-eat-better-to-support-your-mental-health/ Sat, 14 May 2022 00:10:12 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/nutrition-with-jane-mcclenaghan-eat-better-to-support-your-mental-health/ GOOD food is so much better when shared, isn’t it? The theme for this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week is loneliness. In all cultures and societies, people use food as the focal point of social gatherings. We use food to celebrate and comfort. After the past two years, many of us are taking advantage of […]]]>

GOOD food is so much better when shared, isn’t it?

The theme for this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week is loneliness.

In all cultures and societies, people use food as the focal point of social gatherings. We use food to celebrate and comfort.

After the past two years, many of us are taking advantage of a return to normalcy to get together and share food with friends and family.

I think there is nothing better than cooking with friends and sitting around a table to share food.

Eating together has been shown to strengthen community bonds, create family bonds and friendships, alleviate feelings of loneliness, depression and anxiety, and help nurture a sense of belonging.

It will therefore not be surprising to know that people who are socially isolated tend to eat less well. Whether it’s because some people find it harder to shop and cook for one person, or feelings of loneliness mean less motivation to cook a decent meal, we know that socially isolated people often have an appetite. reduced, eat fewer meals per day and consume less protein, fruits and vegetables in their diet.

For others, feelings of isolation may mean more comfortable eating, less nutritious choices, and overconsumption of fast foods like bread, processed foods, and takeout; a slice of toast to keep you going, or another bowl of cereal to fill a hungry gap.

Social distancing and Covid isolation have posed an additional challenge for people of all ages, and that includes a nutritional challenge.

Reduced access to healthy foods, working from home and changes in daily routines have altered our eating habits.

Living alone does not mean being alone. I know many people who prefer independence and eat better than if they lived with others, but with the changes in society caused by the pandemic, some people feel more isolated. We can have feelings of loneliness if we also live with others.

It can be hard to get motivated if you’re feeling lonely, but hopefully these simple ideas will get you thinking and maybe help you eat better to support your mental health.

KEEP YOUR REGULAR MEALS

Having a daily routine will help you take care of your health in a more structured way. It will also keep you more aware of what you are eating and help you eat the main meals, rather than just surviving on snacks.

PLAN 3 OR 4 DAYS AHEAD

Think about what you could cook quickly and easily that will help feed and sustain you. Plan meals around vegetables and protein (eg, eggs, meat, fish, legumes), with some slow-release carbs (whole grains, with more fiber for slow, sustained energy).

TO MIX TOGETHER

Eat a variety of different foods rather than sticking to the same meals every day. A menu planner will help you with this.

COOK ONCE, EAT TWICE

One-pot meals like bolognese, curry, and chili can make four servings; one for today, leftovers for tomorrow and two portions for the freezer.

STORE

Keep a well-stocked pantry so you always have a few ingredients on hand to prepare a simple meal. Eggs, legumes, canned tomatoes, curry paste, some frozen vegetables, brown rice, or whole-grain pasta are good places to start. Omelettes, pressed curry or a quick stir-fry will make a healthy and quick dinner that will satisfy your taste buds and nourish your body.

GET SOCIAL

Call a friend, meet for coffee, or plan to meet for lunch. Making that initial connection can sometimes be difficult, but it will be worth it. You’re not alone.

]]>
Feel ‘The Effect’ | new university https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/feel-the-effect-new-university/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:25:54 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/feel-the-effect-new-university/ Captivating and elegiac, Claire Trevor School of the Arts’ “The Effect” opened April 23 and ran for two weekends at the Robert Cohen Theater before stirring audiences one last time with its closing performance. May, the 1st. Written by British playwright Lucy Prebble and directed by UCI MFA directorial nominee Chloe King, this cynical romantic […]]]>

Captivating and elegiac, Claire Trevor School of the Arts’ “The Effect” opened April 23 and ran for two weekends at the Robert Cohen Theater before stirring audiences one last time with its closing performance. May, the 1st.

Written by British playwright Lucy Prebble and directed by UCI MFA directorial nominee Chloe King, this cynical romantic comedy centers on a clinical trial for a promising antidepressant produced by the fictional “Rauschen Pharmaceuticals.”

At the heart of the play, among the psychiatrists, are two of the participants in the trial: Tristan (Gio Munguia) and Connie (Fiona Palazzi). Disconnected from the outside world within the confines of the medical trial, the couple’s relationship quickly morphs from strangers into something more, with their combined emotional instability and a desire for connection quickly turning into romance.

It is through this relationship that a guiding question of “effect” materializes: whether antidepressant drugs like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are intended to increase levels of serotonin – a sub- chemical of falling in love – can Connie and Tristan’s feelings ever be genuine, sincere? Or are they just side effects of the treatment?

In the process of exploring this troubling situation, the play powerfully propelled audiences into the grim realities and emotional turmoil surrounding mental health care, challenging how we define mental illness and its effects on our perceptions. , our relationships and ourselves.

A big part of what made “The Effect” so impactful is its immersion. Prior to the start of the play, audiences were transported beyond the theater and into Rauschen Pharmaceuticals through intentional costumes, lighting, audio, and staging.

Actors, dressed as doctors, guarded large glass doors on either side of the slightly elevated stage, taking tickets and temperatures from waiting spectators as they welcomed them as participants in the clinical trial. When all the lights except for a light ring in the center of the stage went out, intense, robotic instrumental music rocked the room and large screens illuminated the current date and dose number of medication. The performers chaotically left their places among the audience to swallow their assigned drugs, put on their scrubs and put on their shoes, and take their places in the study.

From there, the play continued with an impressive attention to audience closeness, creating a realistic and interesting atmosphere that didn’t feel overly staged.

The theater itself also contributed to the immersion of the play, and therefore to its effectiveness. Hosting “The Effect” at the Robert Cohen Theater – a black box theater with no stagnant seating arrangement – ​​allowed for a “theater in the round” formation with audience seating surrounding the stage.

At any point in “The Effect,” every actor on stage could be examined from all of the audience’s vantage points. Brilliantly, this simple yet intentional staging and decor created an intimate and artistic atmosphere where the performers connected and inspired the audience in a deeply real and captivating way. The slightest microexpression, movement or mumble felt present and fully seen, while large-scale actions of horror, beauty and grief radiated intensely throughout the space.

The intimacy of this setup demanded and held the full attention of the room’s audience. For better or for worse – even when uncomfortable emotions or disturbing images made people want to escape the current scene – the audience was forced to understand all the good, bad and ugly of the play.

When the character of Dr. Toby Sealy (Robert Zelaya) presented his TED Talk, the audience for the play became his audience. As Connie and Tristan admitted their romantic interest in each other and solidified their sexual attraction, the audience watched the tender, unabashed waltz moment like flies on the wall. As Tristan was overdosed on antidepressants, members of the public, doctors, patients and Connie all watched his pain in mutual horror. In a breathtaking or grotesque way, “The Effect” transcended the natural and expected divisions of theater.

Fascinatingly, “The Effect” blurred the lines between participant and viewer in far more ways than audience immersion; the views of doctors and patients were also examined on stage, highlighting the indifference of depression. As the production acknowledged, anyone can have mental health issues – patients and medical professionals.

Dr. Lorna James (Feyintoluwa Ekisola) illustrated this indeterminacy of the character’s identity in the play. Although she is an expert psychiatrist dedicated to caring for people in the clinical trial and recording accurate results on the effectiveness of the antidepressant, she openly struggled with her own mental health. Filled with guilt surrounding the trial failures and Tristan’s complication, she took a permanent place sleeping on one of the stage benches for the majority of Act 2. As the scenes began and ended around She lay covered and lifeless in a depressed bundle of blankets and sadness, oblivious to the passage of time. By the end of the play, Dr. James needed the reassurance and treatment she once provided, and she eventually turned to antidepressant medication for help – much like the drugs tested during the test she once oversaw.

For audiences, his character’s circularity and haunting imagery left a devastating and sad impact attributed to Prebble’s writing, King’s direction, and Ekisola’s compelling portrayal of the role.

The four lead actors – Munguia, Palazzi, Ekisola and Zeyala – all brought emotional depth, complexity and skill to their performances. Munguia’s performance as Tristan was utterly wonderful – full of dazzling, comedic delivery and seriousness, he was both heartbreaking and charming. Likewise, Palazzi was dynamic, measured, and personable as Connie, and her chemistry with Munguia was delightful. Ekisola’s portrayal of Dr. James was equally powerful and honest, exuding a memorable depth and relativity, especially throughout Act 2 during his character’s declining sanity. Alternatively, Zelaya delivered a terrific, engaging, and believable performance as Dr. Sealy. The movement chorus, consisting of Nathan Bravo, Jamie Collazo, Jeyna Lynn Gonzales, also nicely added movement and presence to the piece.

Creative and captivating, the costumes in the play foreshadowed and paralleled emotions and themes of shifting identity, self-examination and honesty. This was particularly present in Tristan and Connie’s scrubs – from pink to blue and back again – as the lawsuit assured, and the bare leotards covered in neon handprints worn as the couple consummated their relationship. Additionally, the lighting, music, and onstage direction of this scene were executed through gloriously raw movement, articulating organic apprehension, honesty, and bliss through onstage connection.

In its entirety, “The Effect” was an entertaining and important theatrical experience. In the process of examining the effect of antidepressants on a loving mind, he exposed the inner workings and effectiveness of the mental health industry. While the variety of emotions depicted can be overwhelming at times, its colliding plotlines are tied together to produce a moving and necessary examination of a society still feeling the results of pandemic isolation.

As King explained in the director’s notes, “We’re at a point where not only do we need, but we want to improve and be open and honest about our experiences. ‘The Effect’… asks the question: what is a healthy mind, how do we define normalcy and how can the health sector best serve those who need it most.

Clairesse Schweig is an entertainment editor. They can be contacted at cschweig@uci.edu.

]]>
West Fargo Schools Host Virtual Family Mental Health Night – InForum https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/west-fargo-schools-host-virtual-family-mental-health-night-inforum/ Tue, 10 May 2022 02:33:00 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/west-fargo-schools-host-virtual-family-mental-health-night-inforum/ WEST FARGO — West Fargo Public Schools is inviting families to attend an informative new event aimed at supporting the mental health and well-being of youth in the community. A Virtual Family Mental Health Night is scheduled from 7-8 p.m., Wednesday, May 11. The event offers attendees the opportunity to ask questions of leading family […]]]>

WEST FARGO — West Fargo Public Schools is inviting families to attend an informative new event aimed at supporting the mental health and well-being of youth in the community.

A Virtual Family Mental Health Night is scheduled from 7-8 p.m., Wednesday, May 11.

The event offers attendees the opportunity to ask questions of leading family therapists and enjoy a free resource to help families on important topics such as identifying anxiety, depression, grief, suicidal ideation and parenting with purpose. This is the second event of its kind organized this spring, the first in April attracting more than 70 registrations and finally 20 participants.

The event is free for registered participants. Those interested in attending can register at https://bit.ly/3iTS4iy.

For those unable to attend, additional resources are available through Parent Guidance, an online resource offering on-demand virtual classes, professional support and a safe community for families to learn to support the child and receive answers to mental health questions. All courses are created by therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and other certified mental health practitioners.

This virtual event and resources are made possible through a grant from the Cook Center for Human Connection.

]]>
Stop staring at yourself on Zoom calls, it’s bad for your mental health https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/stop-staring-at-yourself-on-zoom-calls-its-bad-for-your-mental-health/ Sun, 08 May 2022 12:09:53 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/stop-staring-at-yourself-on-zoom-calls-its-bad-for-your-mental-health/ Over the past few years, people around the world have been spending more time on video chat programs like Zoom and FaceTime than ever before. These apps mimic in-person dating by allowing users to see the people they are communicating with. But unlike in-person communications, these programs often show users a video of themselves. Instead […]]]>

Over the past few years, people around the world have been spending more time on video chat programs like Zoom and FaceTime than ever before.

These apps mimic in-person dating by allowing users to see the people they are communicating with.

But unlike in-person communications, these programs often show users a video of themselves. Instead of occasionally catching a glimpse of themselves in a mirror, people now stare at themselves for hours a day.

We are psychologists who study society’s attention to women’s appearance and the consequences of this constant scrutiny. We were immediately fascinated by the new dynamic created by the Zoom universe.

Although essential for public safety during the pandemic, we believe that virtual classes, meetings and the like lead to constant focus on one’s own appearance – which research suggests is harmful to mental health, especially for young people. women.

Research has shown that looking in a mirror can increase how you view yourself as an object. Tony Anderson/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Objectification and self-objectification

Objectification is a bit of a buzzword, but the meaning is quite literal: to be seen or treated as an object. This often takes the form of sexual objectification, where bodies and body parts are seen as separate from the person they are attached to.

Advertisements are full of examples of this, where close-ups of certain body parts are often shown to help market a product, such as a bottle of cologne graphically nestled between a woman’s breasts.

Unsurprisingly, women’s bodies are treated as objects far more often than men’s.

Because women and girls are socialized into a culture that prioritizes their appearance, they internalize the idea that they are objects. Consequently, women objectify themselves, treating themselves as objects to be looked at.

Researchers study self-objectification in experimental studies by asking study participants to focus on their appearance and then measure cognitive, emotional, behavioral, or physiological outcomes.

Research has shown that being near a mirror, taking a picture of yourself, and feeling that your appearance is being evaluated by others increases self-objectification. When you log into a virtual meeting, you’re essentially doing all of these things at once.

Two female mannequins in a window.
Self-objectification is linked to many mental and physical health issues, and women are more likely to experience these harms. Vicente Mendez/Moment via Getty Images

What is self-objectification for?

Thinking of yourself as an object can lead to changes in a person’s behavior and physical awareness, and has also been shown to negatively affect mental health in a number of ways.

While these experiences of self-objectification cause women and men to focus on their appearance, women tend to face many other negative consequences.

Research suggests that the experience of self-objectification is cognitively taxing for women.

In a seminal 1998 study, researchers showed that when women put on a new bathing suit and looked in a mirror, the self-objectification it produced caused women to perform poorly on math problems. The men’s mathematical performance was not affected by this objectifying experience.

Moreover, experiencing objectification has behavioral and physiological consequences. In the aforementioned study, trying on a bathing suit produced feelings of shame in women, which led to restricted eating.

Other research has shown that when women see themselves as objects, they speak less in mixed groups.

Self-objectification also leads women to, in a sense, distance themselves from their own bodies. This can lead to impaired motor performance as well as difficulty recognizing one’s own emotional and bodily states.

One study showed that girls who were prone to self-objectification were less physically coordinated than girls who showed less self-objectification.

A woman in a t-shirt at night at a party.
Women who objectify themselves are less likely to say they feel cold when wearing light clothing at night. Ika84/E+ via Getty Images

In a paper we published in 2021, our team showed that women who view themselves as objects have difficulty recognizing their own body temperature. To test this, we asked women how cold they felt when standing outside nightclubs and bars on chilly nights.

We found that the more a woman was focused on her appearance, the less of a connection there was between the amount of clothing she wore and how cold she felt.

For some women, self-objectification can become the default way of thinking about themselves and navigating the world.

High levels of this self-objectification may be associated with mental health consequences, including eating disorders, increased anxiety about one’s appearance, and depression.

Evidence of harm and how to reduce it

Although we are not aware of any research directly exploring the link between video meetings and self-objectification, some recent studies suggest that our concerns are well-founded.

A study found that the more women who focus on their appearance make video calls, the less satisfied they are with their appearance.

Facial dissatisfaction also appears to play a role in Zoom fatigue, with women of all races reporting higher levels of Zoom fatigue than their male counterparts.

For better or for worse, the virtualization of everyday life is here to stay. One way to reduce the negative effects of endless video conferencing is to use the “hide personal picture” feature during online interactions. It hides your image from yourself but not from others.

Disabling auto-display is easy to do and may help some people, but many others – including us – feel it puts them at a disadvantage.

It may be because there are benefits to being aware of your appearance, despite the risk of self-objectification and the harms it entails. A large body of research shows that looking attractive has tangible social and economic benefits, for women more than for men.

By monitoring your appearance, it is possible to anticipate how you will be assessed and adjust accordingly. Therefore, we expect people, especially women, to continue to keep the camera on for the duration of their Zoom calls.

A huge amount of previous research suggests that Zoom calls are a perfect storm for self-objectification and that harm disproportionately affects women.

It seems that the already unequal level playing field for women is being exacerbated in online social interactions.

Any little respite from staring at a literal projection of yourself will be a net gain for your well-being, especially for women.

Editor’s note: This article was written by Roxanne Feligdoctoral student in social psychology, University of South Floridaand Jamie Goldenberg, Professor of Psychology, University of South Florida. This article has been republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Do you have any thoughts on this? Let us know below in the comments or forward the discussion to our Twitter or facebook.

Editors recommendations:

]]>
Q&A: Student-athletes explain how the arts and athletics connect https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/qa-student-athletes-explain-how-the-arts-and-athletics-connect/ Fri, 06 May 2022 08:00:30 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/qa-student-athletes-explain-how-the-arts-and-athletics-connect/ LEXINGTON, Kentucky (May 6, 2022) — Art and athletics have always been intimately linked. From 1912 to 1948, the Olympic Games included artistic competitions in five fields: architecture, literature, music, painting and sculpture. Medals were awards for original sports-inspired artwork. Since then, organizations like Art of the Olympians, founded by US Olympic discus champion Al […]]]>

LEXINGTON, Kentucky (May 6, 2022) — Art and athletics have always been intimately linked. From 1912 to 1948, the Olympic Games included artistic competitions in five fields: architecture, literature, music, painting and sculpture. Medals were awards for original sports-inspired artwork. Since then, organizations like Art of the Olympians, founded by US Olympic discus champion Al Oerter, and British Olympian Roald Bradstock, have made it their mission to find the connection between sport and art.

Continuing this tradition, several students in the Digital Media Design degree program at the University of Kentucky School of Visual Arts and Studies (SA/VS) have discovered this same connection between their own artistic careers and athletic. The College of Fine Arts (CFA) had the chance to meet four of its student-athletes to discuss the symbiosis between their creativity and athletics.

Students include:

  • Darci Kahn, BA Digital Media Junior and Design Major – UK Women’s Athletics Team, 100 Meters Hurdles and 400 Meters Hurdles. Visit Darci’s website: https://darcisimone19.wixsite.com/website.
  • Lincoln T Young, Senior BA specializing in Digital Media and Design with a focus on Animation – UK Men’s Athletics Team, Pole Vaulter. Visit the Lincoln website: https://thefrozensparrow.com/. Young will be graduating from the UK today.
  • Arianna Patterson, Senior Bachelor in Digital Media and Design, with a minor in Arts and Media Studies – UK Women’s Gymnastics Team.
  • Julz Williams, BA Major in Digital Media and Design, Minor in Media Arts and Studies – UK Women’s Cross Country and Athletics Team.

CFA: What is the link between art and athletics in your life?

Kahn: I tend to enjoy the process of creating art, but I’m not always happy with the result. Usually, when I’m not satisfied with the result, many of my peers LOVE my work. Same with the track: I like the process of improvement and practice, but sometimes the result doesn’t always end up the way I planned. But people around me always remind me that I’m doing amazing things and I’m exactly where I need to be.

Young: There are a lot of parallels between what I do in athletics and with my art. The most literal is how having a good sense of movement and how the body works gave me a big advantage when animating because it’s second nature to break down physical movement into its component parts. Also, the art and pole vaulting are similar in that the goal is simple and there are very few, if any, rules for achieving it. Much like how the best flyers all do certain things the same way according to the laws of physics, too many good works of art have things in common, and there are principles that can be used to focus creativity to create something beautiful. I think it’s this balance between order and intuition that leads to good athletic performance and the creation of an emotionally moving piece of art.

Paterson: As an “artistic gymnast”, attention to detail has always been an important part of gymnastics, which has permeated into all areas of my life, especially my creative endeavours. My main interests are video editing, graphic design and dubbing. I made some music videos and edited gymnastics videos for my team. I also make coloring books for children. I think all of this includes some sort of rhythm. Each piece, whether it’s a video, a graphic piece or a voice-over script, has its own song and every detail is like a dance. One thing I’ve always loved is making things look pretty. I like to make my gymnastics skills look pretty with beautifully straight legs, pointy toes, gorgeous leaps and bounds. I also like to make cute videos with nice angles, edits and cuts, and graphic designs with nice colors, patterns and textures.

Williams: There is definitely a connection between the arts and athletics in my life. I got really involved in the arts in my second year of high school when I started my YouTube channel. At the time it was solely focused on my life as an aspiring college runner and now my art is totally influenced and encouraged by the community of runners and other young athletes around me.

CFA: How does one influence the other?

Kahn: Art and the track are my two outlets in life. If life isn’t going so well, I always have a trail and art to help me feel better and forget about the rest of the world.

Young: I don’t think art and athletics really influence each other, for me personally. Although they are similar, I found no advantage in trying to achieve some sort of symbiosis between the two. Beyond the fact that art reflects life and I’ve done a few projects in the past that reference my sport, there’s not a lot of overlap.

Paterson: I think the attention to detail has positively influenced what I do creatively.

Williams: Starting my YouTube channel is what ultimately led me to find my passion in the digital art space, and there will always be a part of my running in my art because that was such a big part of that which got me started. The sensations and excitement that come from running carry over to what I create in my art.

CFA: What came first – your artistic motivation or your athletic motivation?

Kahn: My athletic drive came first. I’ve been playing sports since I was two years old, but never allowed myself to really tap into my artistic side until my senior year of high school. I loved doing art projects during my early childhood, but I never took the time to devote myself to them.

Young: My artistic dynamism came a little before my athletic dynamism. I have always loved sports activities; however, I knew that art, whatever it was, was something I wanted to pursue in my life long before I started pole vaulting.

Paterson: I think that as a gymnast, my athletic and artistic motivations complement each other. Gymnastics is a perfect balance between athletic performance and artistry, unlike many other sports. You can’t have one without the other, both are very necessary to be a great gymnast.

Williams: My athletic drive definitely came first. I grew up being super active and always involved in some sort of sport or activity. In high school, I saw my desperate need for a creative outlet. Creating and editing videos/photos filled that void I had and really allowed me to thrive in my race.

CFA: What else would you like to share about your experience as a student-athlete and artist?

Kahn: My favorite thing about both art and track is that I am able to influence and inspire children and young people with my talents. Many athletes tend not to embrace other talents we might have because we are so focused on our sports. I chose to major in art because art is something I want to learn more about and am passionate about. I encourage everyone to choose an area that they love and want to learn, just as they love and want to learn more about their sport.

Young: For me, art has always been an innate gift, and even if it requires a lot of effort and dedication, I always have control over the result. I think my sporting career has been beneficial to me because it’s almost the complete opposite. My sport also takes a ton of effort and dedication but, at least for me, I have next to no control over how my body performs. It taught me a lot of patience and humility. Pole vaulting is a very mental sport, and if you can maintain composure when your brain isn’t doing what you want, then it’s pretty easy to do in most other areas of your life.

Paterson: My career goals are to continue making coloring books for kids, doing many kinds of video projects like music videos and commercials, and becoming a successful comedian.

Williams: Being a student-athlete and artist has given me so many opportunities that I never thought possible. I was able to create multiple videos for national high school running media and connect with people across the country and encourage them in all their passions and pursuits. Having the chance to reach people and convey love and joy to them through my art and my love for sports has been so fulfilling and truly a blessing.

]]>
As SA vote continues, candidates campaign while students remain apathetic https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/as-sa-vote-continues-candidates-campaign-while-students-remain-apathetic/ Wed, 04 May 2022 04:25:38 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/as-sa-vote-continues-candidates-campaign-while-students-remain-apathetic/ At noon on Monday, voting links for the 2022 Student Assembly elections were sent to the Cornell student body via email. In the election, there are a total of 16 positions being voted on with 4 contested races, including those of President and Executive Vice President. While the SA is the official governing body for […]]]>

At noon on Monday, voting links for the 2022 Student Assembly elections were sent to the Cornell student body via email. In the election, there are a total of 16 positions being voted on with 4 contested races, including those of President and Executive Vice President.

While the SA is the official governing body for undergraduate students at Cornell, many students say they don’t understand the purpose of the assembly or what it does.

“Would I have voted if I didn’t know someone running? Probably not,” said Hailey Choi ’24.

]]>
America’s teens in crisis: Mental health issues are now the biggest concern https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/americas-teens-in-crisis-mental-health-issues-are-now-the-biggest-concern/ Mon, 02 May 2022 15:15:27 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/americas-teens-in-crisis-mental-health-issues-are-now-the-biggest-concern/ By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National CorrespondentMental health disorders are a major concern among American adolescents, according to researchers who said the pervasiveness of these illnesses was not a major concern decades ago. Indeed, 30 years ago, most health experts reported that the top concerns for teens included pregnancy, smoking, drunk driving, and […]]]>

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent
Mental health disorders are a major concern among American adolescents, according to researchers who said the pervasiveness of these illnesses was not a major concern decades ago.

Indeed, 30 years ago, most health experts reported that the top concerns for teens included pregnancy, smoking, drunk driving, and excessive alcohol consumption.

However, new statistics have revealed that in 2019, 13% of teens reported having had a major depressive episode, which Pew Research found was a 60% increase from 2007.

The report found that emergency room visits by children and adolescents during this period also rose sharply for anxiety, mood disorders and self-harm.

And for people ages 10 to 24, suicide rates, flat from 2000 to 2007, jumped nearly 60% in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Additionally, the mental health of young Black Americans “was in crisis long before COVID-19 devastated the world, but no national public health crisis has been called,” said psychiatry resident Dr. Amanda Calhoun. adult/child at Yale Child Study Center at Yale School of Medicine, wrote for Med Page Today.

“In 2019, the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) Emergency Task Force on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health released a report documenting the alarming increase in black youth suicide rates,” noted the Dr. Calhoun.

“Black youth suicide death rates have increased faster than those of any other racial/ethnic group in America, and black youth under 13 are twice as likely to die by suicide as their white peers. “

Dr. Calhoun also cited preliminary federal data that noted that the suicide rate among black girls and women aged 10 to 24 had increased by more than 30% in 2020 and by 23% among black boys and men. of the same age group.

“Yet many predictive models of suicide continue to list ‘white race’ as a factor that increases suicide risk, and the myth that young black people don’t commit suicide persists,” Dr. Calhoun reported.

During the pandemic, children, teens and young adults have faced unprecedented challenges – the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed their worlds, including the way they attend school, interact with friends and receive health care.

Children missed first days of school, months or even years of in-person schooling, graduation ceremonies, sports competitions, appointments, according to a 52-page opinion by US surgeon general Vivek H. Murthy. yourself and time with parents.

As of June 2021, more than 140,000 children in the United States have lost a parent or grandparent to COVID-19.

Matt Richtel, best-selling author and New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, spent more than a year interviewing teens and their families for a series about the mental health crisis.

“In mid-April, I was talking to the mother of a suicidal teenager whose struggles I follow closely. I asked how his daughter was doing,” Richtel reported.

“Not well,” said the mother.

“If we can’t come up with something drastic to help this kid, this kid won’t be here long term.” Richtel said the mother started crying.

“It’s out of our hands, it’s out of our control,” she said. “We try everything.”

She added: “It’s like waiting for the end.”

Over the course of nearly 18 months of reporting, Richtel said he met numerous teens and their families and interviewed dozens of doctors, therapists and teen science experts.

“I heard heartbreaking stories of pain and uncertainty. From the outset, my editors and I discussed how best to manage the identity of people in crisis,” he wrote.

Richtel’s discovery only amplified what medical experts have been circulating.

Since the start of the pandemic, rates of psychological distress among young people have increased, including symptoms of anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders.

“Recent research involving 80,000 young people worldwide found that depressive and anxiety symptoms had doubled during the pandemic, with 25% of young people showing depressive symptoms and 20% showing anxiety symptoms,” Dr Murthy wrote in his opinion. .

According to the CDC, negative emotions or behaviors such as impulsivity and irritability — associated with conditions like ADHD — appear to have moderately increased.

In addition, early clinical data also proved problematic.

At the start of 2021, emergency room visits in the United States for suspected suicide attempts were 51% higher for teenage girls and 4% higher for teenage boys compared to the same period in early 2019.

“Additionally, pandemic-related measures have reduced face-to-face interactions between children, friends, social supports and professionals such as teachers, school counsellors, pediatricians and child protection workers. wrote Dr. Murthy.

“It made it harder to recognize signs of child abuse, mental health issues and other issues.”

The CDC further noted that young people also encountered other challenges that may have affected their mental and emotional well-being during the pandemic.

These include the national death toll of black Americans at the hands of police, including the murder of George Floyd.

This includes COVID-related violence against Asian Americans, gun violence, increasingly polarized political dialogue, growing concerns about climate change, and emotionally charged misinformation.

“The pandemic has been difficult for most people, but the adolescent population, especially women, has suffered tremendously,” clinical psychologist Dr. Carla Marie Manly explained in a recent email.

“Given the importance of social connections during adolescence, many teens have felt extremely isolated, lonely and depressed due to the compelling nature of the pandemic,” Dr. Manly said.

“Many teens have turned to using social media to connect, but social media has its own host of stressors and often increases anxiety and can foster low self-esteem.”

Dr Manly said parents and carers who have teens struggling with anxiety or depression are often confused and unsure which way to go.

Many parents worry that talking about the problem “will only make it worse.”

“Yet in truth, teenagers – even the most independent ones – need the constant presence and gentle guidance of their parents,” Dr. Manly said.

Cathy Mills, chief strategy officer for Net Influencer, insisted that balancing work life and mental health is crucial.

“I consider it very important that employers and family members, in particular, support young people in the process of depression and anxiety,” Mills advised.

“Something that has worked with my family members is offering me treatment to young people. Today, people are very focused on meeting the needs of others and forget that being good with yourself is the most important thing for success in all areas of life,” she continued.

“In these treatments, it is important to write in journals, do meditations, play sports, dance and even travel alone. These actions will make young people more confident and have better mental health, which will help them will allow you to face any situation or challenge at work and in everyday life.

Dr. Jeannette R. Craigfeld, who practices clinical psychology at The Therapy Group of DC in northwest Washington, said friends and family need to listen and understand a loved one’s perspective.

“Let them know that you’re ready to listen to them whenever they want to talk and that you can also just sit down with them if that’s what they need,” Dr. Craigfeld demanded.

“Give your loved one permission to be wherever they are with their depression and anxiety and not have to force themselves to look good around you.”

Dr. Craigfeld continued:

“Remember that there are no easy fixes for mental illness. It’s hard to do with someone you love, because it’s hard to hear that they’re in pain. Still, it’s important to remember that listening to and understanding them will relieve your loved ones of their depression and anxiety far more than anything else you could do.

“It’s also important to make sure you’re also taking care of yourself, because it’s hard to take care of others if you’re not at your best first. Allow yourself to take time for yourself whenever you need it and to do things that calm you down.

]]>
Stress and IBS are as much related as food and IBS https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/stress-and-ibs-are-as-much-related-as-food-and-ibs/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 15:04:13 +0000 https://gloucesterdowntownassociation.org/stress-and-ibs-are-as-much-related-as-food-and-ibs/ IIf you’re one of the millions of people with irritable bowel syndrome, also known as IBS (between 10-15% of people in the United States have it), chances are you’ve heard talk about a diet called the low diet. -FODMAP diet. This diet was created in 2005 by experts at Monash University in Melbourne who were […]]]>
IIf you’re one of the millions of people with irritable bowel syndrome, also known as IBS (between 10-15% of people in the United States have it), chances are you’ve heard talk about a diet called the low diet. -FODMAP diet. This diet was created in 2005 by experts at Monash University in Melbourne who were insightful enough to realize that for many, foods containing short-chain carbohydrates are poorly absorbed, leading to bloating and other problems. digestives.

The low FODMAP diet is a complicated diet and cuts out many nutrient-dense foods, which is a shame. But many people with IBS have found it relieves their symptoms, so it’s become *the* diet that GI doctors prescribe for many people who come into their office suffering from bloating, constipation, or of diarrhea on the diet.

Even if you haven’t officially become low FODMAP, if you have IBS, you may have tried to avoid flare-ups by cutting out certain foods like gluten or dairy. While scientific studies have shown that certain foods can exacerbate IBS symptoms, a new study has found that foods may play a lesser role in managing it than people have long thought. Posted in the Clinical Nutrition Journal, researchers found that cutting gluten and FODMAPs did not help symptoms that much. The researchers divided a group of 110 people with IBS into two groups. One group completely eliminated FODMAP foods and foods containing gluten. The other group did not. They found that FODMAP foods seemed to make symptoms worse, but not as much as researchers previously thought. As for gluten? It didn’t seem to have any effect anyway.

This is a small study; only 110 people. Additionally, there are other studies that have shown that reducing FODMAPs and gluten can benefit IBS. But what the study clearly shows is that managing IBS is not just about food. Here, two gastroenterologists explain why diet is only part of the solution.

What causes IBS?

Before discussing the best way to treat IBS, it is useful to know what IBS is. “Irritable bowel syndrome has formal diagnostic criteria that must be met to receive a formal diagnosis,” explains gastroenterologist Marvin Singh, MD. Basically, these formal diagnostic criteria ask a lot of questions about your poo. What’s it like, how often do you go, if you’re in pain… “There’s a calculator that takes [symptoms] into account and helps determine if it meets an official diagnosis,” says Dr. Singh. Gastroenterologist Rabia De Latour, MD, adds that there are also subcategories, IBS-Diarrhea and IBS-Constipation.

This is important to know because it shows that IBS is not just someone with any kind of digestive distress if doctors can’t figure out what else it could be; certain criteria must be met. If you think you have IBS, see a gastroenterologist to be sure.

While there are clear, established criteria for what IBS is, the two experts say what causes it is less straightforward. “IBS is multi-faceted; it’s not that simple,” says Dr. Singh. “Food, stress, sleep, and other lifestyle factors have been found to affect the microbiome, causing issues that ultimately lead to a diagnosis of IBS.” Dr. De Latour says one factor that scientific studies have particularly found to be linked to IBS is stress. “There is a very strong link between IBS and mental health,” she says. “It has been well established by many gastroenterologists anecdotally that a person who experiences a lot of personal stress or anxiety has more severe symptoms of IBS.” She adds that this is yet another example of how the mind and gut are truly intertwined.

This is exactly why the two GI docs say that food is only part of the solution to managing IBS.

How to Manage IBS Besides Changing What You Eat

If you suffer from IBS, Dr. Singh and Dr. De Latour say stress management has to be part of the solution. “The brain has a direct influence on the composition of the microbiome. If you feel anxious on a regular basis, not only can this change the bacterial composition of the gut, but it can also cause the digestive tract to work faster or slower,” said Dr. Singh explains. “This can lead to symptoms like constipation, diarrhea or bloating.” If you’ve ever experienced nasty stomach issues before a big presentation or meeting, you’ve seen this powerful connection firsthand.

That’s why both doctors advise finding a way to deal with stress and anxiety on a regular basis. They say it will be different for different people. Maybe your favorite stress reliever is going for a run outdoors after work. Maybe it’s breathing or stretching exercises. It could be a luxurious bubble bath. The key is to find something. Many of these pain relievers have been scientifically proven to help improve IBS symptoms, such as yoga and meditation. Others still need to be investigated to confirm a connection. (Where’s the sign-up sheet for the luxurious bath study?) But both doctors say managing stress is key.

Of course, if you regularly have flare-ups after eating, just eating can be stressful. If this is your case, Dr. De Latour suggests working with a therapist in addition to a gastroenterologist, specifically an eating disorder specialist. These experts can give you tips on how to actually enjoy mealtime instead of stressing yourself out while making sure you’re getting the nutrients your body needs.

In addition to managing your stress, Dr. Singh says it’s also important to make sure you get enough sleep to manage IBS. “Altercations in the sleep cycle are another factor that can alter the microbiome,” he says. In his opinion, scientific studies have shown that some people with IBS also have a sleep disorder.

If you’re on medication, Dr. De Latour says that’s another thing to consider, as some can make IBS symptoms worse. For example, certain painkillers, cough medicines, and antidepressants can exacerbate symptoms. For this reason, she says it’s important to tell your primary care physician (or other specialists) that you have IBS before you get prescribed medication. IBS isn’t just something to discuss with an IM doc.

So what about food? Does he still play a role in the management of ICS? Both doctors say yes, but not the only role. “The low FODMAP diet is not meant to be followed by someone indefinitely, as it excludes a lot of healthy foods, so I work with patients by very slowly reintroducing FODMAP foods, having them follow the way the different subgroups make them feel.” said Dr. Singh.

What is clear is that taking care of your gut goes beyond diet; you also need to take care of your mental health. It’s the only way to stop IBS from getting in the way of you living your best life. The most encouraging news of all is that he can be managed. It just requires a little more personal care, and it’s something that anyone can benefit from.

Oh hi! You sound like someone who loves free workouts, discounts on top wellness brands, and exclusive Well+Good content. Join Well+, our online community of wellness insiders, and unlock your rewards instantly.

]]>